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The following code is rejected by VC++ and clang.

Why does using A::f not work as expected?

Is there any way to hide some names in a given name space?

namespace A
{
    int f()
    {
        return 1;
    }
};

namespace B
{
    int f()
    {
        return 2;
    }
};

using namespace A;
using namespace B;

using A::f; // I want to hide B::f and only use A::f, how to do?

int main()
{
    auto n = f(); // error : call to 'f' is ambiguous
}
share|improve this question
1  
Can you come up with a title that won't require future visitors to name their namespaces and variables the same way you did to find it? –  AAA Jun 20 at 3:49
2  
Why do you expect it to work? Both the f()s are visible. Also, you don't need a semicolon after the closing brace of a namespace. –  Praetorian Jun 20 at 3:49
    
The using declaration is purely redundant here. –  chris Jun 20 at 3:52
    
C++ using is not Java import. In java you can do something like import java.util.*; import java.sql.*; import java.sql.Date; and clear up the ambiguity. In C++ you can't. –  T.C. Jun 20 at 4:01

2 Answers 2

The standard specifies the interpretation of the using directive. Emphasis mine:

A using-directive specifies that the names in the nominated namespace can be used in the scope in which the using-directive appears after the using-directive. During unqualified name lookup (3.4.1), the names appear as if they were declared in the nearest enclosing namespace which contains both the using-directive and the nominated namespace. [ Note: In this context, “contains” means “contains directly or indirectly”. — end note ]

(C++11 §7.3.4/2)

Thus, after

using namespace A;
using namespace B;

an unqualified lookup for the name f finds A::f and B::f as though they have been declared in the global namespace. The declaration using A::f introduces the name f into the global namespace in the same way (although it differs in that it actually makes A::f a member of the global namespace), so it is redundant as far as unqualified lookup goes. The point is that unqualified name lookup for f finds both A::f and B::f in the same declarative region.

Solution?

int main()
{
    using A::f;
    auto n = f(); // no longer ambiguous; finds A::f
}

The first place that unqualified name lookup looks in is the block scope of main, so it will find only A::f, even though A::f and B::f would both be found in the enclosing namespace scope if searched.

share|improve this answer

Because of this:

using namespace A;
using namespace B;

Both f functions are in scope. They have the same signature, so what would you expect to happen?

This using directive:

using A::f();

Is redundant.

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1  
obviously the OP was confused because they magically expected the redundant directive to override using namespace B. –  AAA Jun 20 at 3:54
    
@djechlin: Ok, well that's wrong and I said so. What's your point? Do you just not like how I worded it? It's true that I didn't go to the spec. –  Ed S. Jun 20 at 3:59
    
Firstly I wrote the comment before your edit. But your exact words were "what would you expect to happen?" which I feel was obvious from the question, and obvious in such a way that makes it clear that using both namespaces really wasn't the point (so it was actually a strictly correct but useless answer before your edit). The OP wanted to know why the redundant using didn't do anything, to which a perfectly good answer is "it just doesn't" (which is explained in your edit). –  AAA Jun 20 at 5:14
    
I don't think quoting the spec is necessary. Probably the OP had a more complicated problem based on this misunderstanding, narrowed it down to that example, and is surprised enough it was worth confirming on SO or somewhere authoritative. To the OP the behavior could have plausibly been more subtle than "it's redundant." Maybe it was "you have to put the using A::f first to avoid conflicts later." Or some other subtlety. –  AAA Jun 20 at 5:17

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