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During my exploration of IPC, dealing specifically with threads and sockets in python 3.4.1, i experienced something that's a bit curious and i don't quite understand what's going on. Currently (and successfully (for now)) i am using an anonymous pipe with os.pipe() to send a termination signal to a thread holding a socket connection.

My goal was to terminate the thread in a graceful manner. I tried used a boolean flag at first, but since the select call was blocking, i had to send a termination signal to something that select.select could read; a socket, pipe, stdin, etc, hence breaking the select call.

Before I discovered how to use a pipe to communicate with the thread and penetrate the select call, i broke off development into a testing branch.

Let me explain my situation. Basically this works...:

import os
import threading
import select

class MyThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, pipein):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        # The pipe to listen for terminate signals on
        self.pipein = pipein
        self.stopped = False
        self.inputs = [self.pipein]

    def run(self):
        print("Thread-1 Started")
        while not self.stopped:
            inputready, outputready, errors = select.select(self.inputs, [], [])
            for i in inputready:
                if i == self.pipein:
                    signal = os.read(self.pipein, 64)
                    # 64 An arbitrary length that should be enough in any case
                    print("The thread received stuff on the pipe: %s" % signal)
                    if signal == b'stop':
                        print("Stop command received.")
                        print("Exiting.")
                        self.stopped = True
                        break

if __name__ == "__main__":

    # Create the communication pipes
    pipe = os.pipe()

    # Start the worker thread
    print("Starting the worker thread...")
    t = MyThread(pipe[0])
    t.start()
    print("Worker thread started.")


    stopped = False

    # Enter the main loop
    while not stopped:
        command = input("Command to send to thread: ")
        os.write(pipe[1], bytes(command, 'UTF-8'))
        stopped = True

and if i type 'stop' in the terminal i get this:

localhost:ipc.git $ python3 pipes.py
Starting the worker thread...
Thread-1 Started
Worker thread started.
Command to send to thread: stop
The thread received stuff on the pipe: b'stop'
Stop command received.
Exiting.
localhost:ipc.git $ clear

and this doesn't:

import os
import threading
import select

class MyThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, pipein):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        # The pipe to listen for terminate signals on
        self.pipein = pipein
        self.stopped = False
        self.inputs = [self.pipein]

    def run(self):
        print("Thread-1 Started")
        while not self.stopped:
            inputready, outputready, errors = select.select(self.inputs, [], [])
            for i in inputready:
                if i == self.pipein:
                    signal = os.read(self.pipein, 64)
                    # 64 An arbitrary length that should be enough in any case
                    print("The thread received stuff on the pipe: %s" % signal)
                    if signal == b'stop':
                        print("Stop command received.")
                        print("Exiting.")
                        self.stopped = True
                        break

if __name__ == "__main__":

    # Create the communication pipes
    pipein, pipeout = os.pipe() # Seperate into reader fd and writer fd

    # Start the worker thread
    print("Starting the worker thread...")
    t = MyThread(pipein) # Give the thread the receiver
    t.start()
    print("Worker thread started.")


    stopped = False

    # Enter the main loop
    while not stopped:
        command = input("Command to send to thread: ")
        # Write on the variable of pipe[1]: pipeout
        os.write(pipeout, bytes(command, 'UTF-8'))
        stopped = True

The difference is, is get a

OSError: [Errno 9] Bad file descriptor

when trying to read of write from a variable created from pipe

like:

pipein, pipeout = os.pipe()

or

pipe = os.pipe()
pipein = pipe[0]
pipeout = pipe[1]

however if i use the pipe[0] and pipe[1] to read and write respectively with os.read() and os.write() it works just fine!

So creating any sort of variable to pipe[0] or pipe[1] does not work, and i get and OSError. Same thing applies if i create a class call Communicator and put the pipe[0] and pipe[1] as instance variables.

Could anyone explain why this is the case? Will i never be able to write to variables of pipe[1], or is this just because i going between threads?

If you know of another way for inter thread communication that can be used within or interupt a select call, i'm all ears.

I tried an instance of io.StringIO or io.{OtherIOHere} but they to don't support a fileno() call so they don't work with select

I would like to create a class to contain my communication pipes for better useability but until i find out why variable of a pipe don't work i cant.

Any input or advice is appreciated.

Edit:

Added some debug tests:

import os
import threading
import time
import select

class MyThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, pipein):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.pipein = pipein
        self.stopped = False
        self.inputs = [self.pipein]

    def run(self):
        print("Thread-1 Started")
        while not self.stopped:
            inputready, outputready, errors = select.select(self.inputs, [], [])
            for i in inputready:
                if i == self.pipein:
                    signal = os.read(self.pipein, 64)
                    print("The thread received stuff on the pipe: %s" % signal)
                    if signal == b'stop':
                        print("Stop command received.")
                        print("Exiting.")
                        self.stopped = True
                        break

if __name__ == "__main__":

    # Create the communication pipes
    pipe = os.pipe()
    pipein = pipe[0]
    pipeout = pipe[1]

    # Some Print debugs
    print(type(pipein))
    print(type(pipeout))
    print(pipein)
    print(pipeout)
    print(type(pipe))
    print(type(pipe[0]))
    print(type(pipe[1]))
    print(pipe[0])
    print(pipe[1])


    # Start the worker thread
    print("Starting the worker thread...")
    t = MyThread(pipein)
    t.start()
    print("Worker thread started.")

    # Enter the main loop

    stopped = False


    while not stopped:
        command = input("Command to send to thread: ")
        os.write(pipeout, bytes(command, 'UTF-8'))
        stopped = True

@ Dave, the funny thing is, this works now and have not the faintest idea why. I did the same this is two different projects. In both cases i couldn't write to a variable of pipe[1]

 localhost:ipc.git $ python3 pipes.py
<class 'int'>
<class 'int'>
3
4
<class 'tuple'>
<class 'int'>
<class 'int'>
3
4
Starting the worker thread...
Thread-1 Started
Worker thread started.
Command to send to thread: stop
The thread received stuff on the pipe: b'stop'
Stop command received.
Exiting.
localhost:ipc.git $ 

Edit 2

Ok I have created the Communicator class to communicate between threads with a pipe. It comes with easy-to-use read() and write() methods. Everything seems to be hunky dory. Wonder why it didn't work before. Must have been a system related thing. Perhaps my works with sockets and threads has it on edge.

Here is the complete functional code:

import os import threading import select

class MyThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, comm):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.comm = comm
        self.stopped = False
        self.inputs = [self.comm.pipein]

    def run(self):
        print("Thread-1 Started")
        while not self.stopped:
            inputready, outputready, errors = select.select(self.inputs, [], [])
            for i in inputready:
                if i == self.comm.pipein:
                    signal = self.comm.read()
                    print("The thread received stuff on the pipe: %s" % signal)
                    if signal == b'stop':
                        print("Stop command received.")
                        print("Exiting.")
                        self.stopped = True
                        break

class Communicator:
    def __init__(self):
        self.pipe = os.pipe()
        self.pipein = self.pipe[0]
        self.pipeout = self.pipe[1]

    def write(self, msg):
        os.write(self.pipeout, msg)

    def read(self):
        return os.read(self.pipein, 64)

if __name__ == "__main__":

    # Create the communication pipes
    #pipe = os.pipe()
    #pipein = pipe[0]
    #pipeout = pipe[1]

    # Use the communicator class
    comm = Communicator()


    # Some Print debugs


    # Start the worker thread
    print("Starting the worker thread...")
    t = MyThread(comm)
    t.start()
    print("Worker thread started.")

    # Enter the main loop

    stopped = False

    while not stopped:
        command = input("Command to send to thread: ")
        comm.write(b'stop')
        stopped = True

Thanks for your help guys.

share|improve this question
    
Unless I'm missing something, this should definitely work. You're saying the only thing you changed was the pipe variable (going from bracket access on a tuple to separate variables)? The 2 values should just be integers. Try adding some print statements in for debug to see what the descriptors are. Are you running things between the 2 versions in the exact same way, from the exact same directory, etc? – daveydave400 Jun 20 '14 at 5:19
    
I admire your analytical debugging skills dave, I did exactly what you suggested before I posted the question. Perhaps i should have included those test. Yes, they are just integers, same directory, nothing changed, and I am one to check at least 3 times. I will edit the post now and include the result from the print() tests. – Rudker Jun 20 '14 at 5:24
    
Well dave, It seems to be working now. Both with pipeout = pipe[1] and pipein, pipeout = os.pipe() I have no idea what could have changed. Perhaps some underlying pipe pet peevs or permissions. Let me try and create a Communicator class to hold the pipe and see if that works. – Rudker Jun 20 '14 at 5:36
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I copied and pasted your two examples of code into 2 files on my macbook, ran them with python 3.4.1 (from macports), entered 'stop', and they both worked.

What operating system are you using?

Edit: Looks like you "fixed" it. Good job. ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, it's the craziest thing. I was like: "THIS DOES NOT MAKE SENSE." Yet sometimes these things happen. Im using MacOSX 10.9.2 and Python 3.4.1. I'll update my question in a bit for future browsers after i test the pipes in a communicator class, since thats when i first experienced the problem. – Rudker Jun 20 '14 at 5:37

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