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This below rewrite redirects localhost to http://www.example.com/?id=211&test=1 but I want that localhost on browser should not be changed but the page will come form the above link.

I am using this rewrite rule on my Apache conf:

 RewriteEngine On
 RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^localhost$ [OR]
 RewriteRule ^/?$ http://www.example.com/?id=211&test=1 [L]
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This below rewrite redirects localhost to http://www.example.com/?id=211&test=1 but I want that localhost on browser should not be changed but the page will come form the above link.

If you want to load a page from elsewhere without chaining the URL, mod_rewrite is the wrong tool for the job. Use mod_proxy instead. First enable it in Apache like this; example assumes you are on Ubuntu 12.04 but should work on most any Linux Apache install

sudo a2enmod proxy proxy_http

Then set this to enable a reverse proxy from your root path of / to http://www.example.com/?id=211&test=1:

<IfModule mod_proxy.c>

  # Proxy specific settings
  ProxyRequests Off
  ProxyPreserveHost On

  <Proxy *>
    AddDefaultCharset off
    Order deny,allow
    Allow from all
  </Proxy>

  ProxyPass / http://www.example.com/?id=211&test=1
  ProxyPassReverse / http://www.example.com/?id=211&test=1

</IfModule>

EDIT: Seems like mod_proxy and query strings for the destination do not mix; emphasis mine:

This directive allows remote servers to be mapped into the space of the local server; the local server does not act as a proxy in the conventional sense, but appears to be a mirror of the remote server. The local server is often called a reverse proxy or gateway. The path is the name of a local virtual path; url is a partial URL for the remote server and cannot include a query string.

So if there is anyway you could set another page—maybe on localhost—that would bounce it behind the scenes. Meaning this happens on localhost:

ProxyPass / bounce.php

And then the file, bounce.php could have this line in it:

<?php
  header('Location: http://www.example.com/?id=211&test=1');
?>

Which would allow mod_proxy to have a valid destination. And then the PHP file does the redirect? Hard to say, but the query string on your destination server is the issue.

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1  
+1 good detailed answer about mod_proxy –  anubhava Jun 20 '14 at 6:39
    
@anubhava Thanks! Learning about mod_proxy changed my systems administrator life. Apache on the fronted with 100% anything else on any port on the backend. –  JakeGould Jun 20 '14 at 6:42
    
One issue i forgot to mention "on localhost I have apache running" and on [link](example.com) nginx is running. So I am now getting 404 Not Found error with above configuration on localhost –  user3382916 Jun 20 '14 at 6:42
    
@user3382916 How is that an issue? Then localhost has the mod_proxy stuff enabled. And then the other side with http://www.example.com can be 100% anything else. I use it all the time to pipe Tomcat traffic from port 8080 to Apache on port 80. Works wonderfully. Experiment with the settings for source & destination. It’s an amazing tool. –  JakeGould Jun 20 '14 at 6:44
    
@user3382916 Check what you get from curl -I localhost. That shows the headers & can help you debug. But this should work. –  JakeGould Jun 20 '14 at 6:46

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