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I have a repo (origin) on a USB key that I cloned on my hard drive (local). I moved "origin" to a NAS and successfully tested cloning it from here.

I would like to know if I can change the URI of "origin" in the settings of "local" so it will now pull from the NAS, and not from the USB key.

For now, I can see two solutions:

  • push everything to the usb-orign, and copy it to the NAS again (implies a lot of work due to new commits to nas-origin);

  • add a new remote to "local" and delete the old one (I fear I'll break my history).

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I had to do this on an old version of git (1.5.6.5) and the set-url option did not exist. Simply deleting the unwanted remote and adding a new one with the same name worked without problem and maintained history just fine. –  HotN Sep 11 at 21:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 1883 down vote accepted

You can

git remote set-url origin git://new.url.here

(see git help remote) or you can just edit .git/config and change the URLs there. You're not in any danger of losing history unless you do something very silly (and if you're worried, just make a copy of your repo, since your repo is your history.)

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2  
If you have a different shell user then maybe you want to specify your git user in the beginning of the new url e.g.: myself@git://new.url.here –  sobi3ch Jul 1 '13 at 7:49
1  
You may also want to set the master upstream branch for your new origin location with: git branch -u origin/master. This will allow you to just git push instead of having to git push origin master every time. –  kelorek Aug 13 '13 at 18:06
8  
@kelorek or you can just git push -u origin master the first time :) –  hobbs Aug 14 '13 at 19:38
7  
GitHub has nice help pages help.github.com/articles/changing-a-remote-s-url –  Kimvais Sep 4 '13 at 8:42
    
you'll probably have to do a git pull to merge contents after that: stackoverflow.com/questions/1713137/… –  Alejandro Moreno Sep 18 '13 at 9:15
git remote -v
# View existing remotes
# origin  https://github.com/user/repo.git (fetch)
# origin  https://github.com/user/repo.git (push)

git remote set-url origin https://github.com/user/repo2.git
# Change the 'origin' remote's URL

git remote -v
# Verify new remote URL
# origin  https://github.com/user/repo2.git (fetch)
# origin  https://github.com/user/repo2.git (push)

Changing a remote's URL

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Change Host for a Git Origin Server

from: http://pseudofish.com/blog/2010/06/28/change-host-for-a-git-origin-server/

Hopefully this isn’t something you need to do. The server that I’ve been using to collaborate on a few git projects with had the domain name expire. This meant finding a way of migrating the local repositories to get back in sync.

Update: Thanks to @mawolf for pointing out there is an easy way with recent git versions (post Feb, 2010):

git remote set-url origin ssh://newhost.com/usr/local/gitroot/myproject.git

See the man page for details.

If you’re on an older version, then try this:

As a caveat, this works only as it is the same server, just with different names.

Assuming that the new hostname is newhost.com, and the old one was oldhost.com, the change is quite simple.

Edit the .git/config file in your working directory. You should see something like:

[remote "origin"]
fetch = +refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
url = ssh://oldhost.com/usr/local/gitroot/myproject.git

Change oldhost.com to newhost.com, save the file and you’re done.

From my limited testing (git pull origin; git push origin; gitx) everything seems in order. And yes, I know it is bad form to mess with git internals.

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A bit unsecured I believe, since the password is stored in clear-text, but here's how it has worked for me:

Check your local repo-folder/.git/config file for:

[remote "origin"]
    fetch = +refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
    url = https://user:password@code.google.com/p/project-name/

If it's not conforming to that format, change it by running:

git remote set-url origin https://your_user_name_or_gmail_address:your_password@code.google.com/p/your_project/

then just commit and push.

your_user_name_or_gmail_address is the username you have set in your google code account, or your gmail address if you enabled using that as your user name in your google code account preferences.

your_password is the randomly generated password you can find in your account preferences page or your gmail password if you're using your gmail address as your user name.

your_project is the name your reposistory was created under.

For the correct origin url you can verify your project on google code under the checkout section where you can find the correct checkout url for your project. It won't contain the :your_password part though so you need to add that. The url I used should be correct though but it might change in the future so if it doesn't work, make sure to check that out.

TIP: if you just created a repo, checked out that empty repo then initial commits don't work (at the time of writing) because there is no branch defined to commit to when the repo is empty, so if you get into that problem, google for it.

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