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Given a base class with the following interface:

public class Base
{
    public virtual IEnumerable<string> GetListOfStuff()
    {
        yield return "First";
        yield return "Second";
        yield return "Third";
    }
}

I want to make a derived class that overrides the method, and adds its own stuff, like so:

public class Derived : Base
{
    public override IEnumerable<string> GetListOfStuff()
    {
        foreach (string s in base.GetListOfStuff())
        {
            yield return s;
        }

        yield return "Fourth";
        yield return "Fifth";
    }
}

However, I'm greeted with a warning that "access to a member through a base keyword from an iterator cannot be verified".

What's the accepted solution to this problem then?

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5  
Note that this is fixed in C# 4 (and... in C# 3 SP 1? Maybe? I don't remember if we got that fix in or not. We intended to.) The compiler now generates the helper for you. –  Eric Lippert Mar 12 '10 at 14:52
    
I got the warning in VS2008 SP1. –  Dave Van den Eynde Mar 13 '10 at 10:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

How about:

public class Derived : Base
{
    public override IEnumerable<string> GetListOfStuff()
    {
        return base.GetListOfStuff().Concat(GetMoreStuff());        
    }
    private IEnumerable<string> GetMoreStuff()
    {
        yield return "Fourth";
        yield return "Fifth";
    }
}
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Instead of a helper function for the base stuff, a helper function for the stuff in this class. Good idea! –  Dave Van den Eynde Mar 12 '10 at 13:09

Incidentally, the reason for this odd behaviour is that the CLR security team changed the verifier right before v2 shipped, such that it became unverifiable to do a non-virtual call on a virtual method of one class from a method in a different class.

For further explanation of this issue see my article on the subject from a few years back.

http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2005/11/14/why-are-base-class-calls-from-anonymous-delegates-nonverifiable.aspx

This is now out-of-date; we've fixed up the compiler so that it now generates the helper for you.

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It's because the iterator gets turned into a private class, and accessing superclass methods from an inner class is not verifiable (as it has to force the 'this' pointer to something other than itself).

Try creating a new private method in Derived:

private IEnumerable<string> GetBaseListOfStuff()
{        
    return base.GetListOfStuff();
}

and call that instead of base.GetListOfStuff()

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It seems that one solution was to simply follow what the "manual" says: make a helper function.

So for now I've solved it like this:

public class Derived : Base
{
    private IEnumerable<string> GetBaseStuff()
    {
        return base.GetListOfStuff();
    }

    public override IEnumerable<string> GetListOfStuff()
    {
        foreach (string s in GetBaseStuff())
        {
            yield return s;
        }

        yield return "Fourth";
        yield return "Fifth";
    }
}

But I'm curious about other solutions as well, should they exist.

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