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I have a list of books in a file that consist the id, book name, the author, the year written, genre and more. I can't find how to read from file Books.txt

(extract)

1   The Da Vinci Code   Dan Brown   2003    mistery-detective   20  3
2   Think and Grow Rich Napoleon Hill   1937    non-fiction 50  5
3   Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince  J. K. Rowling   2005    fantasy 92  8
4   The Catcher in the Rye  J. D. Salinger  1951    novel   100 6

to struct array the information the correct way f.e. Book_list[0].id should be 1, Book_list[0].name = The Da Vinci Code and etc.. The idea is that each peace of information is separated by a tab. I'm sorry in advance if i ask something not clear enough.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>

struct Book
{
    int id;
    std::string name;
    std::string author;
    int year;
    std::string genre;
    int times_given;
    int available;
};

int main()
{
    int book_list_size = 500;
    int number_of_books = 0;

    Book book_list[book_list_size];
    std::ifstream book_input_stream("Books.txt");

    std::string line;

    while (std::getline(book_input_stream, line))
    {
        ++number_of_books;
    }

    book_input_stream.close();
    book_input_stream.open("Books.txt");

    for (int i = 0; i < number_of_books; i++)
    {
        book_input_stream >> book_list[i].id >> book_list[i].name
                >> book_list[i].author >> book_list[i].year
                >> book_list[i].genre >> book_list[i].times_given
                >> book_list[i].available;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < number_of_books; i++)
    {
        std::cout << book_list[i].id << " " << book_list[i].name << " "
                << book_list[i].author << " " << book_list[i].year << " "
                << book_list[i].genre << " " << book_list[i].times_given << " "
                << book_list[i].available << std::endl;
    }

    book_input_stream.close();

    return 0;
}
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marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ, GWW, genpfault, lpapp Jun 21 at 2:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
In particular check this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/23070803/1413395 –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 20 at 15:05
    
Are you supplied with such a file, or are you creating it? –  aceBox Jun 20 at 15:17
    
If you can change the text file, then possibly using a delimiter would be the best...in that case, you can differentiate between the various fields. –  aceBox Jun 20 at 15:20
    
Is this the actual content of the data? What character(s) separate the fields? –  Thomas Matthews Jun 20 at 16:13

2 Answers 2

If you have lines of data, with fields separated by tabs, the normal solution would be to read line by line, and break each line up into its respective data, and then finally convert any data which needs converting. And Book should have a constructor; although with C++11, it's possible to do without, a constructor still makes things cleaner. Something like:

std::vector<Book> books;
std::string line;
int lineNumber = 0;
while ( std::getline( input ) ) {
    ++ lineNumber;
    std::vector<std::string> fields( split( line, '\t' ) );
    if ( fields.size() != 7 /* || other validations */ ) {
        //  error handling...
        //  it's nice when the error messages contain the line number
    } else {
        books.push_back(
            Book(
                asInt( fields[0] ),
                fields[1],
                fields[2],
                asInt( fields[3] ),
                fields[4],
                asInt( fields[5] ),
                asInt( fields[6] ) ) );
}

For that matter, you could (and usually should) define a >> operator for Book:

std::istream&
operator>>( std::istream& source, Book& dest )
{
    std::string line;
    std::getline( source, line );
    if ( source ) {
        std::vector<std::string> fields( split( line, '\t' ) );
        if ( fields.size() != 7 /* || other validations */ ) {
            source.setstate( std::ios_base::failbit );
        } else {
            dest = Book(
                    asInt( fields[0] ),
                    fields[1],
                    fields[2],
                    asInt( fields[3] ),
                    fields[4],
                    asInt( fields[5] ),
                    asInt( fields[6] ) );
    }
    return source;
}

Then, all you need to do is:

std::vector<Book> books;
Book book;
while ( input >> book ) {
    books.push_back( book );
}
share|improve this answer

First there is this marvelous class called std::vector that is basically a variable length array, so you don't have to read the file twice. You can just add

#include <vector>

to the top of your file and write:

std::vector<Book> book_list;

to create the list. From then you can add new books with:

book_list.push_back(Book());

and access the already added books in a familiar way:

book_list[0].id

As for reading from a file, the >> operator reads until any whitespace, to stop only at tabs use

string s;
getline(book_input_stream, s, '\t');

of course like with all get* function whitespace will not be skipped, so make sure you only use one tab, or use book_input_stream >> std::ws to skip additional whitespace.

One possible way to read a book is:

Book b;
book_input_stream >> b.id >> std::ws;
getline(book_input_stream, b.name, '\t');
book_input_stream >> std::ws;
getline(book_input_stream, b.author, '\t');
book_input_stream >> b.year >> std::ws;
getline(book_input_stream, b.genre, '\t');
book_input_stream >> b.times_given >> b.available;
book_list.push_back(b);
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