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I have a variadic function like :

void test(int){}

template<typename T,typename...Args>
void test(int& sum,T v,Args... args)
{
    sum+=v;
    test(sum,args...);
}

I want to alias it to something like :

auto sum = test;//error : can not deduce auto from test
int main()
{
    int res=0;
    test(res,4,7);
    std::cout<<res;
}

I tried using std::bind but it doesn't work with variadic functions because it needs placeholders ...

Is it possible to alias a variadic function ?

share|improve this question
3  
auto sum = [](auto&&... pp) { return test(std::forward<decltype(pp)>(pp)...); }; or something like that. It's not a true alias, though; for example, you can't use auto x = &sum<int, double>;. –  dyp Jun 20 at 15:10

3 Answers 3

In C++1y :

#include <iostream>

void test(int){}

template<typename T,typename...Args>
void test(int& sum,T v,Args... args)
{
  sum+=v;
  test(sum,args...);
}

template<typename T,typename...Args>
decltype(test<T, Args...>)* sum = &(test<T, Args...>);

int     main(void)
{
  int   res = 0;
  sum<int, int>(res, 4, 7);
  std::cout << res << std::endl;
}

Alternatively wrap it in another variadic function and std::forward the arguments :

template<typename T,typename...Args>
void    other(int&sum, T v, Args&&... args)
{
  test(sum, std::move(v), std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, but I doubt type deduction will work for this "alias". –  dyp Jun 20 at 16:44
    
@dyp Currently it does not with the usual compilers, but maybe some day not so far :) –  Drax Jun 20 at 16:45
    
Hmm I doubt the syntax for variable templates will support this; since the template defined has no patterns to match with the arguments of the function call. Consider specializations of the variable template. Only in very restricted contexts could a variable template be seen as an alias, and the compiler had to look "through" this layer of abstraction. –  dyp Jun 20 at 16:50
    
std::forward<T>(v) is not necessary since T v is not a universal reference. std::move(v) is sufficient. –  dyp Jun 20 at 16:53
    
@dyp updated :) As for the deduction i agree with you although an obvious case to try automatic deduction is when an operator() is called on a variable template which means it is most likely a callable which might be totally deduced by that call. But i'm not a compiler writer so this is total speculation ^^ –  Drax Jun 20 at 16:58

What you are trying is not much different from

void test(int)
{
}

void test(double, int)
{
}

auto a = test;

There is no way for the compiler to detect which overload you want to use.

You can be explicit about which test you want to assign to a by:

auto a = (void(*)(int))test;

If you want to add the variadic template version to the mix, you can use:

template<typename T,typename...Args>
void test(int& sum,T v,Args... args)
{
    sum+=v;
    test(sum,args...);
}

auto a = test<int, int, int>;
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BTW for this case, if he wanted test(double, int), he could do this: ideone.com/KFJnjh –  awesomeyi Jun 20 at 15:18
    
I know that , I was looking for a way for alising variadic function. @dyp solutions seems working with gcc 4.9 ,coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/d3aabbd801efe463 –  omid Jun 20 at 15:20
    
It is not answering the question.BTW auto a = test<int, int, int>; does not works : coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/4c19105de2b3d597 –  omid Jun 20 at 15:27
    
@xyz, It works for me. ideone.com/SLOzgq –  R Sahu Jun 20 at 15:38
    
For three arguments, you use auto a = test<int, int> –  awesomeyi Jun 20 at 15:45

This is not aliasing.auto a = test tries to declare a variable a with the same type as test and make them equal. Since test isn't a single function, but a function template (and on the top of that you can even overload functions), the compiler can't decide on what the type of a should be.

To alias a template, or as a matter of fact any symbol, you can use the using keyword.

using a = test;

Edit: sorry this one only works for types not functions.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work: ideone.com/xJccNe –  awesomeyi Jun 20 at 15:43
    
you can't alias a template function with using ! –  omid Jun 20 at 15:44
    
Yeah, my bad, you can alias a functor though. Well then it's impossible currently in C++. –  Evan Dark Jun 20 at 17:30

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