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For example, I have a base class with a number of methods

class A
{
public:
    void f1();
    int f2() const;
    float f3(double a, char b) const;
    ...
};

And a class B is privately derived from A. I want to some of A's methods are public, how to do it?

class B : private A
{
public:
    using A::f1; 
    using A::f2;

    template<class... Args>
    RETURN f3(Args&&... args) CONSTNESS  { return A::f3(args...); }
    // how to specify return and constness automatically

    ... 
};

I try the above ways, they don't work. The template way need to specify return and constness automatically.

Asked the wrong question, in my real case, A is a template class

template<class T>
class A
{
public:
    void f1();
    int f2() const;
    float f3(double a, char b) const;
    ...
};

B is derived from A

 template<class T>
 class B : public A
 {
 public:
     using A::f1; // wrong
     using A<T>::f1; // okay
 };
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closed as off-topic by Matthieu M., Mark B, 0x499602D2, genpfault, lpapp Jun 21 '14 at 2:32

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – 0x499602D2, lpapp
  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – Matthieu M., Mark B, genpfault
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3  
The using A::f1 should work. What compiler do you use? –  nosid Jun 20 '14 at 16:41

1 Answer 1

The using A::f1 should work, but it will expose all functions called f1 in A. If you don't want this you need to create a proxy for each function you want to expose

The trick with your template

template<class... Args>
RETURN f3(Args&&... args) CONSTNESS  { return A::f3(args...); }

can be done only with meta program, but it would not work anyway because you cannot overload a function on it's return type, so you cannot select the right function, unless you are willing to write f3<float> each time you are invoking the function.

You cannot 'specify' the return value and constness, because you are not specyfying anything. you create all possible f3 functions with different parameters and those that don't have a corresponding f3 in A will simply fail to compile when used.

But that's as far as you can go. if you create all f3 functions with all possible results, the compiler won't know witch one to call as you cannot overload a function on it's result.

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