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I want to design a view/view controler that automaticaly shows/hides a subview when in landscape orientation. I want the subview to dissapear completely and other subviews to take up its space.

Using a UIViewController, I wrote code that sets the subviews' frame property and call it on:

- (void)willAnimateRotationToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation duration:(NSTimeInterval)duration;

This solves the problem most of the times but has problems when the orientation change is happening when the view is not appearing. to bypass this, I am also calling the resizing method on:

- (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated;

but this has problems in some rare cases (involving a UISearchDisplayController) so I am also calling the resizing method on

- (void)viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated;

As you can understand, I am unhappy with this code and I am looking for a better/more performant way to do this.

Any ideas?

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I'm offering a bounty on this question. In my case, I've got a UIWebView at the center of my view, with an ad banner at the bottom. I want to remove the ad banner and have the UIWebView resize to fill the missing space on resize. I tried just removing the banner from the superview, but the UIWebView does not resize to fill the empty space (even though all autoresizing masks are enabled). –  Dan Fabulich Mar 21 '11 at 19:14
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6 Answers

Assuming all you have is a UIWebView and an ad banner, then you can just manually resize the webView when in landscape:

- (void)willRotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)toOrientation 
                                duration:(NSTimeInterval)duration
{
    if (toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait ||
        toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown) {
            [adView setHidden:NO];
        }
    } else {
        if (toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft ||
            toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight) {
            [adView setHidden:YES];
        }       
    }
}

Then also do

- (void)didRotateFromInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)fromOrientation 
                                duration:(NSTimeInterval)duration
{
    UIInterfaceOrientation toOrientation = self.interfaceOrientation;
    if (toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait ||
        toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown) {
            [webView setBounds:CGRectMake(0.0,0.0,320.0,436.0)];
        }
    } else {
        if (toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft ||
            toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight) {
            [webView setBounds:CGRectMake(0.0,0.0,480.0,320.0)];
        }       
    }
}

The dimensions assume 44.0 height for the ad banner and no nav bar (44.0) or status bar (20.0), so you may need to adjust the numbers for your layout.

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This is surprisingly not working -- or, rather, it is working, but there's a big catch. If you resize like this in "willRotate", iOS will then re-transform the sizes after rotation. So when going to portrait, you have to resize the (currently landscape) webView to 480x~291 (100%x90%); iOS will transform that to 320x436. When going to landscape, you must resize to 320x480, which iOS will transform to 480x320. (head explodes) Is there really no better way? –  Dan Fabulich Mar 21 '11 at 21:34
1  
I decomposed my previous answer into both will and did methods. This should improve the implementation. –  PengOne Mar 21 '11 at 21:40
    
Doing the resizing in didRotateFromInterfaceOrientation was the missing trick. I do have to call this code in viewWillAppear as well, so it might not answer @Panagiotis Korros, but it's worth my bounty. –  Dan Fabulich Mar 24 '11 at 5:21
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Inside

- (void)didRotateFromInterfaceOrientation:
    (UIInterfaceOrientation)fromInterfaceOrientation

To hide it

sub_view.hidden = YES;

To show it again

sub_view.hidden = NO;
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1  
thank you for your response but the hidden property just hides the view. It doesn't resize other views to take up its space. –  Panagiotis Korros Mar 12 '10 at 14:30
    
Oh, you want to do that. Have you checked if you could use layoutSubviews and layoutIfNeeded? –  Tuomas Pelkonen Mar 12 '10 at 14:35
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If there are several subviews that need to be laid out very differently in landscape and portrait, then it may be easier to hack it with an extra UIView, say landscapeView, added in the IB. Load this view up with buttons, subviews, etc and lay it out as you like. You can use all the same connections as with the usual (portrait) view. Remember to declare IBOutlet UIView *landscapeView; in the header. Then you can add the view using this:

- (void)willRotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)toOrientation 
                                duration:(NSTimeInterval)duration
{
    if ([landscapeView superview]) {
        if (toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait ||
            toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown) {
            [landscapeView removeFromSuperview];
        }
    } else {
        if (toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft ||
            toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight) {
            [[self view] addSubview:landscapeView];
        }       
    }
}

If the timing doesn't work out as you like, then you could also try something similar inside

-(void)didRotateFromInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)fromInterfaceOrientation;

If you want to get even fancier, then you can leave the main view empty, create both a UIView *portraitView and a UIView *landscapeView, then remove the current view in willRotateToInterfaceOrientation and add the new view in didRotateToInterfaceOrientation.

To be safe, you should also make sure the correct view is shown initially:

- (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [super viewWillAppear:animated];
    UIInterfaceOrientation toOrientation = self.interfaceOrientation;
    if (toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait ||
        toOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown) {
        [self.view addSubview:portraitView];
    } else {
        [self.view addSubview:landscapeView];
    }

}

and also

- (void)viewWillDisappear:(BOOL)animated
{
    if ([landscapeView superview]) {
        [landscapeView removeFromSuperview];
    }
    if ([portraitView superview]) {
        [portraitView removeFromSuperview];
    }
}
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Neither of these options will work in my case [and I'm the one currently offering a bounty :-)]. I've got a UIWebView with an ad banner at the bottom; I want to remove the banner in landscape view. If I try solution #1 to remove the banner, the UIWebView does not resize to fill the space. If I try solution #2, I can't share the UIWebView between the separate landscape/portrait views. –  Dan Fabulich Mar 21 '11 at 19:12
    
Oh. If that's all you need, then just manually resize the webview. –  PengOne Mar 21 '11 at 20:20
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an option is to present a modal view with a crossfade transition on rotate, and to dismiss it when it gets rotated back.

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Personnaly, for situations like this, I feel like coding your subView's position is much simpler than relying on the framework's layout management.

So, assuming you app displays a title bar, which has a height of 20 points, here's what I would do:

- (void)willAnimateRotationToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)toInterfaceOrientation duration:(NSTimeInterval)duration{
    CGFloat titleBarHeight = 20;
    CGFloat navBarHeight = self.navigationController.navigationBar.frame.size.height;
    if(UIInterfaceOrientationIsPortrait(toInterfaceOrientation)){
        webView.frame = CGRectMake(0, 0, 320, 480 - titleBarHeight - navBarHeight - adView.frame.size.height);
        adView.hidden = NO;
    }else{
        webView.frame = CGRectMake(0, 0, 480, 320 - titleBarHeight - navBarHeight);
        adView.hidden = YES;
    }
}
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See my comment to @PengOne. This is surprisingly tricky/inelegant. Is there really no better way? –  Dan Fabulich Mar 21 '11 at 21:36
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I take advantage of the parent view's bounds in my code. Try the code below see if the animation works well for you.

- (void)willRotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)toInterfaceOrientation duration:(NSTimeInterval)duration{
    [super willRotateToInterfaceOrientation:toInterfaceOrientation duration:duration];
    switch (toInterfaceOrientation) {
        case UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft:
        case UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight:
        {
            webView.frame = self.view.bounds;
        adView.hidden=YES;
            break;
        }
    }
}


- (void)didRotateFromInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)fromInterfaceOrientation{
    [super didRotateFromInterfaceOrientation:fromInterfaceOrientation];

    switch (fromInterfaceOrientation) {
        case UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeLeft:
        case UIInterfaceOrientationLandscapeRight:
        {
            webView.frame = originalFrame;
            adView.hidden=NO;
            break;
        }
    }
}

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    webView.autoresizingMask = UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleWidth | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleHeight;
    adView.autoresizingMask = UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleWidth;
    originalFrame = webView.frame;
}

- (BOOL)shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation {
    return YES;
}
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