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I noticed that my boost mutiarrays were performing very badly compared to STL Vector. I came upon this question asked earlier, where the most liked answer stated that

1) Boost is nearly as fast as native array

2) You need to change the order in which you access your data elements to get the best performance out of Boost MultiArray. Also, that you need to run in Release mode, and not Debug.

Well, I did all that, and yet the performance of my MultiArrays is pretty shabby.

I am posting my code here :

A) WITH DEFAULT ORDERING

#include <windows.h>
#define _SCL_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS
#define BOOST_DISABLE_ASSERTS 
#include <boost/multi_array.hpp>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    const int X_SIZE = 400;
    const int Y_SIZE = 400;
    const int ITERATIONS = 500;
    unsigned int startTime = 0;
    unsigned int endTime = 0;

    // Create the boost array
    typedef boost::multi_array<double, 2> ImageArrayType;
    ImageArrayType boostMatrix(boost::extents[X_SIZE][Y_SIZE]);

    // Create the native array
    double *nativeMatrix = new double [X_SIZE * Y_SIZE];

    //------------------Measure boost----------------------------------------------
    startTime = ::GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; ++i)
    {
        for (int y = 0; y < Y_SIZE; ++y)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < X_SIZE; ++x)
            {
                boostMatrix[x][y] *= 2.345;
            }
        }
    }
    endTime = ::GetTickCount();
    printf("[Boost] Elapsed time: %6.3f seconds\n", (endTime - startTime) / 1000.0);

    //------------------Measure native-----------------------------------------------
    startTime = ::GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; ++i)
    {
        for (int y = 0; y < Y_SIZE; ++y)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < X_SIZE; ++x)
            {
                nativeMatrix[x + (y * X_SIZE)] *= 2.345;
            }
        }
    }
    endTime = ::GetTickCount();
    printf("[Native]Elapsed time: %6.3f seconds\n", (endTime - startTime) / 1000.0);

    return 0;
}

B) WITH INVERTED ORDERING

#include <windows.h>
#define _SCL_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS
#define BOOST_DISABLE_ASSERTS 
#include <boost/multi_array.hpp>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    const int X_SIZE = 400;
    const int Y_SIZE = 400;
    const int ITERATIONS = 500;
    unsigned int startTime = 0;
    unsigned int endTime = 0;

    // Create the boost array
    typedef boost::multi_array<double, 2> ImageArrayType;
    ImageArrayType boostMatrix(boost::extents[X_SIZE][Y_SIZE]);

    // Create the native array
    double *nativeMatrix = new double [X_SIZE * Y_SIZE];

    //------------------Measure boost----------------------------------------------
    startTime = ::GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; ++i)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < X_SIZE; ++x)
        {
            for (int y = 0; y < Y_SIZE; ++y)
            {
                boostMatrix[x][y] *= 2.345;
            }
        }
    }
    endTime = ::GetTickCount();
    printf("[Boost] Elapsed time: %6.3f seconds\n", (endTime - startTime) / 1000.0);

    //------------------Measure native-----------------------------------------------
    startTime = ::GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; ++i)
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < X_SIZE; ++x)
        {
            for (int y = 0; y < Y_SIZE; ++y)
            {
                nativeMatrix[x + (y * X_SIZE)] *= 2.345;
            }
        }
    }
    endTime = ::GetTickCount();
    printf("[Native]Elapsed time: %6.3f seconds\n", (endTime - startTime) / 1000.0);

    return 0;
}

In every possible permutation, my benchmarks are approximately the same :

1) For Native code : 0.15s

2) For Boost MultiArray : 1.0s
I am using Visual Studio 2010.

My question is : given that I am using Visual Studio, how to get good performance from Boost MultiArrays?

UPDATE :

I switched over to Visual Studio 2013. There, I enabled the Qvec-report2 compiler switch. And very interestingly, when I compiled, I started receiving an info message saying that the compiler was failing to vectorize. Here is a sample info message which looks almost like a warning. I received several such messages for the simplest of code.

--- Analyzing function: void __cdecl `vector constructor iterator'(void * __ptr64,unsigned __int64,int,void * __ptr64 (__cdecl*)(void * __ptr64)) 1> D:\Workspace\test\Scrap\Scrap\Source.cpp : info C5002: loop not vectorized due to reason '1301'

I think this is a major clue as to why Boost multiarrays are performing slower on my Visual Studio while they perform alright on GCC. Given this extra information, can you please think of a way to resolve the problem?

@Admins : Kindly unmark my question as previously answered. I have made a major edit.

share|improve this question
    
You might want to compare the generated assembler code. Also you might want to consider putting this on codereview.se. Furthermore I don't see what the exact difference between yours and the linked question is, as the questioner is getting to the same results as you (as well as the "answers" stating they get the same difference for msvc compilers), and the answers that get different values use gcc. –  PlasmaHH Jun 20 at 20:34
    
Does that mean there is no way to get good performance from MultiArrays in Visual Studio? No, the answers to the previously asked question do not help me. So, clearly it is an unresolved issue for me. Go, use GCC is not an answer. –  user3670482 Jun 20 at 20:39
1  
Rules of SO say that new questions should be new, and just because another didn't get an answer isn't a good enough reason to repost it, even if it is old. I am not drawing any conclusion of if it is possible or not; I suggest you do a real analysis, starting with the generated assembler code, looking for major differences. There evidently is some difference, and if you spot it, you might even be able to reformulate your question in terms of "why is this generated assembler faster" (if it isn't obvious then already) –  PlasmaHH Jun 20 at 20:42
    
Where did the questioner say he was using MSVC? May be the questioner was using GCC himself, and was satisfied by the answer since it worked for GCC. –  user3670482 Jun 20 at 20:46
3  
There are multiple hints, like using <windows.h> talking about debug/release builds, using _SCL_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS and not objecting to the observation "It looks like you are using msvc++" as well as using GetTickCount to measure performance (winapi) –  PlasmaHH Jun 20 at 20:49

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