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I have a third party application that stores time series data as a packed binary file. I am trying to create a tool to convert the data stored in this file.

Shown below is a snapshot of this data.

41 16 00 00 01 00 D7 11 00 00 01 00 E8 55 A6 20 08 1E D0 08 00 00 00 60 59 D5 
86 40 03 E8 F5 2C 22 08 1E D0 08 00 00 00 00 C0 0B 87 40 01 E8 95 B3 23 08 1E 
D0 08 00 00 00 40 1E 00 87 40 01 E8 35 3A 25 08 1E D0 08 00 00 00 60 13 F8 86
40 01 E8 D5 C0 26 08 1E D0 08 00 00 00 40 65 09 87 40 01 E8 75 47 28 08 1E D0 
08 00 00 00 20 8A F6 86 40 01 E8 15 CE 29 08

I know that this block of data corresponds to the following values.

5/13/2013 17:46:11.558  730.6686401
5/13/2013 17:46:14.118  737.46875
5/13/2013 17:46:16.678  736.0147705

I can extract the values: they are of type double. For instance, the 8 bytes 00 00 00 60 59 D5 86 40 correspond to 730.6686401.

But I am stumped by how to extract the datetime format. I know that it is buried in this string somewhere. How can I figure out what format the time is in?

I have been using Python's struct module for the type conversion.

Anybody have any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Judging by the other 2 float values, encoded as doubles, there are only 9 bytes between these to encode the date-time value. – Martijn Pieters Jun 20 '14 at 21:01
    
Also, the sequence [08 1E D0 08] repeats 6 times, always 13 bytes apart. Are there only 3 values in this block, or are there more than 3? – aruisdante Jun 20 '14 at 21:02
    
@aruisdante: I'd say there are at least 6 sets in there. – Martijn Pieters Jun 20 '14 at 21:11
    
The sequence [E8 X5] also repeats (7 in this case, but looks like this block may be truncated and there would have been another 08 1E sequence), where X is a varying number, 2 bytes before the 08 1E squence – aruisdante Jun 20 '14 at 21:17
    
Can 8 bytes be enough to store the information? – d0m1n0 Jun 21 '14 at 2:16
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you take the 8 bytes immediately before one of the double, and consider it as an integer (low-endian, like the double), then you get the following numbers:

635040567715583464
635040567741183464
635040567766783464

If you divide these numbers by 10**7, then you get the date as a number of seconds (and fractional seconds). At least it corresponds in the minutes, seconds, and fractions of seconds. For the hours I get an off-by-two error (timezone?). For the complete date, the day number 735000(*) corresponds to the 5/13/2013 as follows. It's the number of days from the year 1:

>>> datetime.date(1,1,1) + datetime.timedelta(735000)
datetime.date(2013, 5, 13)

(*) that's any of these numbers divided by 10**7 * 60 * 60 * 24

Or in a single step:

>>> x = 635040567715583464 / 10.**7 / 86400
>>> datetime.datetime(1,1,1) + datetime.timedelta(x)
datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 13, 15, 46, 11, 558353)
share|improve this answer
    
datetime supports ordinals (datetime.datetime.fromordinal(735000)). So the numbers are offsets from a 1/1/1 00:00:00 epoch instead of the UNIX epoch? – Martijn Pieters Jun 21 '14 at 8:46
    
so ordinal, rem = divmod(635040567715583464, 10**7 * 86400), then datetime.datetime.fromordinal(ordinal) + datetime.timedelta(microseconds=rem/10.0) gives you the correct date datetime.datetime(2013, 5, 12, 15, 46, 11, 558346), in UTC presumably. – Martijn Pieters Jun 21 '14 at 8:54
    
I'm unsure what exactly fromordinal(735000) does, but the result is one day off (the 12th instead of the 13th). Of course the final result is still 2 hours off, so maybe we should really use fromordinal() and consider the result to be 22 or 26 hours off instead. – Armin Rigo Jun 21 '14 at 12:32
    
fromordinal() interprets the integer as days since 1/1/0001. If there is an off-by-one in there that should be easily corrected. – Martijn Pieters Jun 21 '14 at 15:04
    
I dug into the 2 hour difference. Out could be due to the fact that the data was collected during European Summer Time. @Armin Rigo, does the time conversion give us the time in UTC? – d0m1n0 Jun 21 '14 at 15:19

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