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How can I (more) efficiently write out an if / else conditional that uses the same variable and a huge amount of OR operators?

I've been banging my head on the desk trying to think of a way around writing out all of these OR operators with the same comparison. For loops won't do the trick, and I'm pretty certain that a do / while loop wouldn't do it either. A switch / case might solve this, but I don't think it could condense the code or make it any less tedious to write out.

The example below illustrates my dilemma. The API has a protocol method which is called for each section in the collection and needs a return value for the number of items in that section. Essentially, the protocol method below is a fancy for loop.

- (NSInteger)collectionView:(UICollectionView *)collectionView numberOfItemsInSection:(NSInteger)section {
    if (section == 0 || section == 31) return 7;
    else if (section == 1 || section == 26 || section == 27 || section == 28 || section == 29 || section == 30) return 6;
    else if (section == 2 || section == 3 || section == 4 || section == 5 || section == 6 || section == 7 || section == 8 || section == 9 || section == 10 || section == 11 || section == 12 || section == 13 || section == 14 || section == 15) return 2;
    else if (section == 16 || section == 17 || section == 18 || section == 19 || section == 20 || section == 21 || section == 22 || section == 23 || section == 24 || section == 25) return 4;
    else return 7;
}

As you can see in the extremely tedious if / else conditional I've written, it checks for every single section. I feel like I'm missing something - that Objective-C provides a nifty way around this kind of tedious and inefficient conditional writing / checking?

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1  
You could use a dictionary for these mappings. –  CrimsonChris Jun 21 at 3:43
    
Or even better, don't use static values. Have an array that represents each section. Then just ask the appropriate array how large it is. The code you've shared seems like an attempt to get around using a view model. Don't fight it, view models are awesome. –  CrimsonChris Jun 21 at 3:45
    
Yes, having a proper data structure would solve this. That said, several of your conditional expressions amount to checks that a value is in a range of integers. You could collapse those down to 2 <= section && section <= 15 and 16 <= section && section <= 25, etc. –  Ken Thomases Jun 21 at 3:47
    
...or just use NSIndexSex. That's what it's for. –  quellish Jun 21 at 3:48
    
You're right about using <= and >= @KenThomases, but this question can also be applied more generally (eg. with strings, dictionaries, etc.). –  Sam Jun 21 at 3:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A clean way is to use a switch statement. These are usually implemented with a branching array, so are quite efficient.

switch (section)
{
case 0:
case 31:
    return 7;
...
}

And the most efficient of all (branchless) is a lookup-table:

const int nums[]= { 7, 6, 2, 2, 2... };

return nums[section];
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I'd recommend using switch. Cleaner, clearer and easy to comment to describe what you're doing. Using bitmasks and range collapsing can hide the intent and introduce unintended errors. –  lornix Jun 21 at 22:51

switch is probably the right answer, but you can also use shift/mask, something like:

int sectionBit = 0x00000001 << section;
if (sectionBit & 0x80000001) return 7;
if (sectionBit & 0x7c000002) return 6;
etc

The disadvantage of this approach is that it's tedious and error-prone to define the bit constants, but one can sometimes develop the constants by using enums, etc (at the expense of long declaration strings).

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A generic approach to this is to use NSArray / NSDictionary to build indexes, something like:

NSArray *sections = @[@3, @5, @27, ...];
if ([sections containsObject:@3]) ...

or

NSDictionary *sections = @{ @5: @27, @7: @23, ... };
int value = [sections[@(section)] intValue]
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