Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I implemented the composite pattern using smart pointers, it works until a point.

The problem is that I just can use the methods that is implemented in the interface and I can not use the methods that is defined in the derived class without using dynamic_pointer_cast and I don't want it.

I want to know if it's possible to do it without using dynamic_pointer_cast.

I heard that I need to implement the visitor pattern, but I really don't know how to and if it fits in that problem.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <memory>

class Fruit
{
public:
    virtual void getOld() = 0;
};

class Orange : Fruit
{
public:
    Orange() {}

    void add(std::shared_ptr<Fruit> f)
    {
        v.push_back(f);
    }

    std::shared_ptr<Fruit> get(int k)
    {
        return v[k];
    }

    void getOld()
    {
        std::cout << "Orange - I'm old." << std::endl;
    }
private:
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Fruit>> v;
};

class Bitter : public Fruit
{
public:
    Bitter() {}

    void getOld()
    {
        std::cout << "Bitter - I'm old." << std::endl;
    }

    void getNew()
    {
        std::cout << "Bitter - I'm new." << std::endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    auto orange = new Orange;
    orange->add(std::make_shared<Bitter>());
    auto bitter = orange->get(0);
    bitter->getOld();

    return 0;
}

It works as you can see here on the live preview, but when I try to use:

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    auto orange = new Orange;
    orange->add(std::make_shared<Bitter>());
    auto bitter = orange->get(0);
    bitter->getOld();
    bitter->getNew();

    return 0;
}

I got errors:

error: 'class Fruit' has no member named 'getNew'

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

The problem here I think is that it would work with polymorphism but the method 'getNew' doesn't exist in the mother class so you need to define it and make it virtual. It's the only way to do it without using a cast on the object. With this line it should work.

virtual void getNew() = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
I know it, but what happen if I have dozens of classes with different methods? The interface will be a mess with a lot of methods, don't you think? - Let's wait in order to see if someone has a solution or at least a way to make this better. Thanks. –  SH.0x90 Jun 21 '14 at 4:26
    
The problem might be your design then. If you know what type Orange will return then you can make functions like 'getBitter' instead of just 'get' –  meneldal Jun 21 '14 at 4:46
    
Again the same issue, what happen if I have dozens of classes? I will need to create methods to each one. If we look at implementation side we can do it, but what about the API? –  SH.0x90 Jun 21 '14 at 4:55
    
It's one of the flaws of C++ and Java and you need to make it with a cast or use polymorphism. Once you put a derivate type in a generic one you lose the information about the type itself. The only way to use the specific part of the object is to cast it (which is unsafe, hence why your solution is probably a bad design) –  meneldal Jun 21 '14 at 5:09
    
Why it's unsafe? And you think that the best way is to define the methods in the base class or define a method to get each class that I have? –  SH.0x90 Jun 21 '14 at 5:19

One possible solution is to have the following function in Orange.

template <typename T>
T* get(int k)
{
    return dynamic_cast<T*>(v[k].get());
}

And then use:

auto bitter = orange->get<Bitter>(0);
bitter->getOld();
bitter->getNew();

This performs a dynamic_cast but is localized to Orange.

share|improve this answer
    
you're just hiding the cast here though. You're just moving the problem. –  meneldal Jun 22 '14 at 8:44
    
@meneldal, no argument there. Just providing a mechanism to reduce the spread of dynamic_cast to other functions. –  R Sahu Jun 22 '14 at 14:45

Following information can be found about "composite pattern" from the GOF book. Of course it has been explained based on graphics class.

The key to the Composite pattern is an abstract class that represents both primitives and their containers. For the graphics system, this class is Graphic. Graphic declares operations like Draw that are specific to graphical objects. It also declares operations that all composite objects share, such as operations for accessing and managing its children.

Based on the above explanation,we should ideally declare all possible interfaces of leaf and non-leaf(container) type of node while using composite pattern.I think that this is essential in order to let client treating individual objects and compositions of objects uniformly. So ideally you should declare your classes in the following way while using this particular pattern. Any logic which has been written based on the exact type of object in the client code violates the essence of this pattern.

//Abstract class which should have all the interface common to
// Composite and Leaf class. It may also provide the default 
// implementation wherever appropriate.
class Fruit {
public:
    virtual void getOld() = 0;
    virtual void getNew() = 0;
    virtual void add(std::shared_ptr<Fruit> f) { }
    virtual  std::shared_ptr<Fruit> get(int index ) {return nullptr; }
    virtual ~Fruit() { }
};


//Composite Node
class Orange : Fruit {
public:
    Orange() {}
    void add(std::shared_ptr<Fruit> f) { v.push_back(f); }
    std::shared_ptr<Fruit> get(int k) { return v[k]; }
    void getOld()  { std::cout << "Orange - I'm old." << std::endl; }
    void getNew() { std::cout << "Orange - I'm new." << std::endl; } 
private:
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Fruit>> v;
};


//Leaf node
class Bitter : public Fruit {
public:
    Bitter() {}
    void getOld() { std::cout << "Bitter - I'm old." << std::endl; }
    void getNew() { std::cout << "Bitter - I'm new." << std::endl; }
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.