Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently experimenting with C programming (warning: newbie here) under windows. I am trying to use C code to change the properties of the cmd.exe console I use to execute my output compiled programs. I know I can use the system() function to pass commands to the OS's command interpreter, and it works for "normal" commands such as dir or cd, but I cannot execute any of the programs related to options of the console, such as color or pause.

IS there any way to change these options at runtime via code, and not by typing the commands in the console before launching my executable?

Thanks,

S.

share|improve this question
    
Some commands start programs, some are cmd.exe macros. Instead of "color", try "color.exe" –  Havenard Jun 21 at 18:19
    
Yes, I thought so. So is there no way to execute these macros from code? –  user3763424 Jun 21 at 18:26
    
system("color 0A");//yellow and black back or stackoverflow.com/a/21590640/971127 –  BLUEPIXY Jun 21 at 18:28
1  
Oh, then it is not the default windows shell. You are using sh. It's a Linux shell. Probably you are using MinGW or Cygwin. –  Havenard Jun 21 at 18:31
1  
I think I found the solution. As pointed out by Havenard, color and others are cmd macro and not system commands. In order to make it work I need to ask the OS to pass the color to cmd.exe rather than interpreting it as an OS command. Therefore the syntax is: system("cmd.exe /c color 0A") and this works! –  user3763424 Jun 21 at 18:55

1 Answer 1

You need to use code, like:

HANDLE hCons = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
SetConsoleTextAttribute(hCons, FOREGROUND_GREEN | FOREGROUND_INTENSITY);

These and related functions are defined in Wincon.h. You need to include Windows.h, this will be enough.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.