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I'm using git ls-remote to get commit hashes of branches in a repository of which I don't have a clone.

git ls-remote ssh://gitosis@myServer/myRepo.git master

I'm interested being about specify a commit like master~ and use git ls-remote to figure out what it's commit hash is.

Does Git support this?

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Does Git support this?

No, as I explained in "Show git logs for range of commits on remote server?"

it works on ref patterns (head, tags, branches, ...), not with revs

You would need to fetch first, in order to check origin/master~.


Intended use:

A custom, perhaps hackish, application.
It's a mechanism for users to issue requests to the system for building and installing specific versions of software.
It supports build_request SomeProject someBranch.
For completeness, I think it should support a request for someBranch~.

I suppose it would be possible then to set up a kind of web service, a listener able to interpret a user query and do the git log master~ on that common server.
That listener wouldn't have anything to do with git.

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Shoot.. I was hoping to avoid having to clone an entire repository ust to get a silly little commit hash :( –  ajwood Jun 21 '14 at 19:03
    
@ajwood but you don't have to fetch the all repo, only the branch you want: stackoverflow.com/a/6369199/6309 –  VonC Jun 21 '14 at 19:04
    
Even still.. fetch is way slower than ls-remote –  ajwood Jun 21 '14 at 19:09
    
@ajwood I agree. Why do you want to get that remote master~ SHA1? –  VonC Jun 21 '14 at 19:10
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@ajwood would it be possible then to set up a kind of web service, a listener able to interpret a user query and do the git log master~ on that common server? That listener wouldn't have anything to do with git. –  VonC Jun 21 '14 at 19:29

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