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I have the following method to save an Object to a file:

// Save an object out to the disk
public static void SerializeObject<T>(this T toSerialize, String filename)
{
    XmlSerializer xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(toSerialize.GetType());
    TextWriter textWriter = new StreamWriter(filename);

    xmlSerializer.Serialize(textWriter, toSerialize);
    textWriter.Close();
}

I confess I did not write it (I only converted it to a extension method that took a type parameter).

Now I need it to give the xml back to me as a string (rather than save it to a file). I am looking into it, but I have not figured it out yet.

I thought this might be really easy for someone familiar with these objects. If not I will figure it out eventually.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 226 down vote accepted

Use a StringWriter instead of a StreamWriter:

public static string SerializeObject<T>(this T toSerialize)
{
    XmlSerializer xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(toSerialize.GetType());

    using(StringWriter textWriter = new StringWriter())
    {
        xmlSerializer.Serialize(textWriter, toSerialize);
        return textWriter.ToString();
    }
}

Note, it is important to use toSerialize.GetType() instead of typeof(T) in XmlSerializer constructor: if you use the first one the code covers all possible subclasses of T (which are valid for the method), while using the latter one will fail when passing a type derived from T.    Here is a link with some example code that motivate this statement, with XmlSerializer throwing an Exception when typeof(T) is used, because you pass an instance of a derived type to a method that calls SerializeObject that is defined in the derived type's base class: http://ideone.com/1Z5J1.

Also, Ideone uses Mono to execute code; the actual Exception you would get using the Microsoft .NET runtime has a different Message than the one shown on Ideone, but it fails just the same.

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1  
@JohnSaunders: ok, it is a good idea to move this discussion on Meta. Here is the link to the question I just posted on Meta Stack Overflow regarding this edit. –  Fulvio Jun 13 '12 at 16:22
7  
@casperOne Guys, please stop messing with my answer. The point is to use StringWriter instead of StreamWriter, everything else is not relevant to the question. If you want to discuss details such as typeof(T) versus toSerialize.GetType(), please do so, but not in my answer. Thanks. –  dtb Jun 14 '12 at 13:47
3  
@dtb Sorry, but Stack Overflow is collaboratively edited. Also, this specific answer has been discussed on meta, so the edit stands. If you disagree, then please reply to that post on meta on why you think your answer is a special case and shouldn't be collaboratively edited. –  casperOne Jun 14 '12 at 14:06
1  
Codewise, this is the shortest example I've seen. +1 –  froggythefrog Aug 31 '13 at 22:00
10  
StringWriter implements IDisposable, so should be enclosed in a using block. –  TrueWill Mar 4 '14 at 16:15

Code Safety Note

Regarding the accepted answer, it is important to use toSerialize.GetType() instead of typeof(T) in XmlSerializer constructor: if you use the first one the code covers all possible scenarios, while using the latter one fails sometimes.

Here is a link with some example code that motivate this statement, with XmlSerializer throwing an Exception when typeof(T) is used, because you pass an instance of a derived type to a method that calls SerializeObject<T>() that is defined in the derived type's base class: http://ideone.com/1Z5J1. Note that Ideone uses Mono to execute code: the actual Exception you would get using the Microsoft .NET runtime has a different Message than the one shown on Ideone, but it fails just the same.

For the sake of completeness I post the full code sample here for future reference, just in case Ideone (where I posted the code) becomes unavailable in the future:

using System;
using System.Xml.Serialization;
using System.IO;

public class Test
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Sub subInstance = new Sub();
        Console.WriteLine(subInstance.TestMethod());
    }

    public class Super
    {
        public string TestMethod() {
            return this.SerializeObject();
        }
    }

    public class Sub : Super
    {
    }
}

public static class TestExt {
    public static string SerializeObject<T>(this T toSerialize)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(typeof(T).Name);             // PRINTS: "Super", the base/superclass -- Expected output is "Sub" instead
        Console.WriteLine(toSerialize.GetType().Name); // PRINTS: "Sub", the derived/subclass

        XmlSerializer xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        StringWriter textWriter = new StringWriter();

        // And now...this will throw and Exception!
        // Changing new XmlSerializer(typeof(T)) to new XmlSerializer(subInstance.GetType()); 
        // solves the problem
        xmlSerializer.Serialize(textWriter, toSerialize);
        return textWriter.ToString();
    }
}
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12  
You should also do using (StringWriter textWriter = new StringWriter() {} for proper closing/disposing of object. –  Amicable May 16 '13 at 16:08
    
I completely agree with you @Amicable! I've simply tried to keep my code sample as near as possible to the OP one, in order to highlight my point which is all about object types. Anyway its good to remember anyone that the using statement is the best friend both to us and to our dear IDisposable implementing objects ;) –  Fulvio Apr 5 '14 at 18:56

I know this is not really an answer to the question, but based on the number of votes for the question and the accepted answer, I suspect the people are actually using the code to serialize an object to a string.

Using XML serialization adds unnecessary extra text rubbish to the output.

For the following class

public class UserData
{
    public int UserId { get; set; }
}

it generates

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>
<UserData xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" 
          xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
   <UserId>0</UserId>
</UserData>

Better solution is to use JSON serialization (one of the best is Json.NET). To serialize an object:

var userData = new UserData {UserId = 0};
var userDataString = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(userData);

To deserialize an object:

var userData = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<UserData>(userDataString);

The serialized JSON string would look like:

{"UserId":0}
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Very useful thank you. –  Carter Nolan Mar 7 '14 at 12:08

Serialize and Deserialize:

    public static object DeserializeObject<T>(this string toDeserialize)
    {
        XmlSerializer xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        StringReader textReader = new StringReader(toDeserialize);
        return xmlSerializer.Deserialize(textReader);
    }

    public static string SerializeObject<T>(this T toSerialize)
    {
        XmlSerializer xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        StringWriter textWriter = new StringWriter();
        xmlSerializer.Serialize(textWriter, toSerialize);
        return textWriter.ToString();
    }
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3  
+1 for also showing how to deserialize, unlike all of the other answers. Thanks! –  deadlydog Nov 18 '14 at 15:26
4  
One minor change though would be to return T instead of object, and cast the returned object to T in the DeserializeObject function. This way the strongly typed object is returned instead of a generic object. –  deadlydog Nov 18 '14 at 15:29

My 2p...

        string Serialise<T>(T serialisableObject)
        {
            var xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(serialisableObject.GetType());

            using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
            {
                using (var xw = XmlWriter.Create(ms, 
                    new XmlWriterSettings()
                        {
                            Encoding = new UTF8Encoding(false),
                            Indent = true,
                            NewLineOnAttributes = true,
                        }))
                {
                    xmlSerializer.Serialize(xw,serialisableObject);
                    return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(ms.ToArray());
                }
            }
        }
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+1 for using XmlWriterSettings(). I wanted my serialised XML to not waste space with the pretty print stuff and setting Indent = false and NewLineOnAttributes = false did the job. –  Lee Richardson Nov 17 '14 at 15:37
    
Thanks @LeeRichardson - I needed to do the exact opposite, also XmlWriter under .net defaults to UTF16 which isn't what I was writing out to either. –  oPless Nov 17 '14 at 18:01

I was unable to use the JSONConvert method suggested by xhafan

In .Net 4.5 even after adding the "System.Web.Extensions" assembly reference I was still unable to access the JSONConvert.

However, once you add the reference you can get the same string print out using:

JavaScriptSerializer js = new JavaScriptSerializer();
string jsonstring = js.Serialize(yourClassObject);
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JSONConvert Class is in NewtonSoft.Json namespace. Go to package manager in you VS and then download NewtonSoft.Json package –  Shresthamir Aug 22 at 2:41

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