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My server is controlling windows volume using a third party library. When the server gets a message from the client telling it to change volume it's doing what it need to with no issues. However, I want to inform back to the client whenever the volume was changed locally on the computer.

This library I'm using (https://workspaces.codeproject.com/ray-m/vista-core-audio-api-master-volume-control/article), has an event to notify volume changes.

Problem is, it inform on every small volume change step and therefor the delegate is being called numerous times when a user changes volume. Example:

If current volume is -23db and the user turns up the volume to a -13db then the delegate will be called 10 times!

How can I listen for when the user started changing volume and then when it ended the action?

This way I'll be able to send to the client the update through the delegate only once.

Code tried:

void AudioEndpointVolume_OnVolumeNotification(AudioVolumeNotificationData data)
{

    VolumeTimer.Interval = 300;
    VolumeTimer.Stop();
    VolumeTimer.Start();

}

private void VolumeTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    VolumeTimer.Stop();

    lock (_lock)
    {
        ++_volumeCalledCounter;

        if (_volumeCalledCounter <= 1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Fired");
            _volumeCalledCounter = 0;
        }
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Start/restart a Timer each time. When it Ticks the volume changes are done. Test to find a good Interval, 500ms could work. –  TaW Jun 22 '14 at 9:38
    
Can you give me some example? As far as I see, a timer will fire event automatically on specified intervals. I want to "absorb" some amount of events and only then fire one event –  Yosi199 Jun 22 '14 at 14:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, a Timer can fire repeatedly. Therefore you should Stop and Start it each time you get a volumeChange notification. While these come in faster than the Timer.Interval nothing else will happen. Once they stop coming, the Timer.Tick will finally fire. Here you stop the Timer one last time and fire your own event.

Using a Timer VolumeTimer and the original sources:

defaultDevice.AudioEndpointVolume.OnVolumeNotification += new 
    AudioEndpointVolumeNotificationDelegate(
       AudioEndpointVolume_OnVolumeNotification);


void AudioEndpointVolume_OnVolumeNotification(AudioVolumeNotificationData data)
{
   VolumeTimer.Interval = 100;  // ms, test to gauge!
   VolumeTimer.Stop();
   VolumeTimer.Start();
}

private void VolumeTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   VolumeTimer.Stop();
   // whatever you want to do, when the volume no longer changes:
   yourEvent();         
}

Edit:

The above code should solve the original question.

However, if the user changes the volume slowly but for a prolonged time, your event won't fire all this time. If you want to enforce an UI update a little extra code will do that, using a second Timer VolumeUiTimer :

void AudioEndpointVolume_OnVolumeNotification(AudioVolumeNotificationData data)
{
   VolumeTimer.Interval = 100;  // ms, test to gauge!
   VolumeTimer.Stop();
   VolumeTimer.Start();
   if (!VolumeUiTimer.Enabled) 
      { VolumeUiTimer.Interval = 500; VolumeUiTimer.Start();
}

private void VolumeTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{  // no more changes: all timers stop, update UI
   VolumeTimer.Stop();
   VolumeUiTimer.Stop();
   // whatever you want to do, when the volume no longer changes:
   yourEvent();         
}

private void VolumeUiTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{  //restart timer1, stop timer2, update UI 
   VolumeTimer.Stop();
   VolumeTimer.Start();
   VolumeUiTimer.Stop();
   // whatever you want to do, when the volume no longer changes:
   yourEvent();         
}

I set the Intervals here just for demonstration; they could be moved to after InitializeComponent() or simply into the designer.

Aside on multiple Timers: There was a time when the number of Timers an application could create was limited to, I think 16. That is long gone and there is no problem creating a second Timer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank u that looks interesting, I'll test it soon. –  Yosi199 Jun 22 '14 at 16:10
    
@Yosi199: See my expanded answer! –  TaW Jun 22 '14 at 16:46
    
I've implemented your example (no need for the second timer since I want to fire event only when stopped changing volume, at least for now) But for some reason I still get the event fired twice no matter what! I will post my code implementation in my post –  Yosi199 Jun 22 '14 at 17:12
    
Maybe it was a bug or something because it works good now - firing only one event at a time –  Yosi199 Jun 22 '14 at 17:57
    
Ha, thanks for letting me know!! I was puzzling over this - to test I have hooked into the MouseMove not knowing that this event is unexpectedly tricky and keeps firing for no (obvious) reason even without moving the mouse, which kept me scratching my head.. ;-) –  TaW Jun 22 '14 at 18:05

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