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This might be a simple question.

I want to know which of the 2 statements will take less time to get executed.

if ( a - b > 0 ) or if ( a > b )

In the 1st case, the difference has to be computed and then it has to be compared with 0, while in the 2nd case, a and b are compared directly.

Thanks.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by RiggsFolly, Shaunak D, karthik, Soner Gönül, RDC Jun 23 '14 at 7:06

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
As always, these little differences mean nothing on today's computers. And if it MIGHT matter, it depends on your compiler. So use a profiler and find out yourself in your own situation. – Almo Jun 22 '14 at 2:50
8  
This sort of micro-optimisation has already cost you more time in posting the question than you are ever likely to recover in improved performance. – user1864610 Jun 22 '14 at 2:51
6  
What language? Which compiler? Invoked with what options? The two are not necessarily equivalent; a - b can overflow. – Keith Thompson Jun 22 '14 at 2:52
1  
If the intent is to test whether a is greater than b then do if (a > b). If the other was faster then your compiler should do that transformation for you. – Blastfurnace Jun 22 '14 at 2:54

As Keith Thompson points out, the two are not the same. If a and b are unsigned, for example, a-b is always non-negative, making the statement equivalent to if(a != b).

Anyway, I did an unrealistic test:

int main() {
    volatile int a, b;

    if(a-b>=0)
        printf("a");

    if(a>b)
        printf("b");

    return  0;
}

Compile it with -O3. Here's the disassembly:

    pushq   %rbp
Ltmp2:
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
Ltmp3:
    .cfi_offset %rbp, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
Ltmp4:
    .cfi_def_cfa_register %rbp
    subq    $16, %rsp
    movl    -4(%rbp), %eax
    subl    -8(%rbp), %eax
    testl   %eax, %eax
    jle LBB0_2
## BB#1:
    movl    $97, %edi
    callq   _putchar
LBB0_2:
    movl    -4(%rbp), %eax
    cmpl    -8(%rbp), %eax
    jle LBB0_4
## BB#3:
    movl    $98, %edi
    callq   _putchar
LBB0_4:
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    addq    $16, %rsp
    popq    %rbp
    ret

At -O3, a-b>0 is still using one extra instruction.

Even if you compile it with an ARM compiler, there's an extra instruction:

    push    {lr}
    sub sp, sp, #12
    ldr r2, [sp, #0]
    ldr r3, [sp, #4]
    subs    r3, r2, r3
    cmp r3, #0
    ble .L2
    movs    r0, #97
    bl  putchar(PLT)
.L2:
    ldr r2, [sp, #0]
    ldr r3, [sp, #4]
    cmp r2, r3
    ble .L3
    movs    r0, #98
    bl  putchar(PLT)
.L3:
    movs    r0, #0
    add sp, sp, #12
    pop {pc}

Note that (1) volatile is unrealistic unless you are dealing with e.g. hardware registers or thread-shared memory, and (2) that the difference in practice is not even measurable.

Because the two have different semantics in some cases, write what is correct. Worry about optimization later!

share|improve this answer

If you really like to know, in C, suppose we have test.c:

int main()
{
  int a = 1000, b = 2000;
  if (a > b) {
    int c = 2;
  }
  if (a - b > 0) {
    int c = 3;
  }
}

Compile with gcc -S -O0 test.c, we got test.s:

.file   "test.c"
.text
.globl  main
.type   main, @function
main:

.LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    movl    $1000, -16(%rbp)
    movl    $2000, -12(%rbp)
    movl    -16(%rbp), %eax
    cmpl    -12(%rbp), %eax
    jle .L2
    movl    $2, -8(%rbp)
.L2:
    movl    -12(%rbp), %eax
    movl    -16(%rbp), %edx
    subl    %eax, %edx
    movl    %edx, %eax
    testl   %eax, %eax
    jle .L4
    movl    $3, -4(%rbp)
.L4:
    popq    %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE0:
    .size   main, .-main
    .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu 4.8.2-19ubuntu1) 4.8.2"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

Please see the above

    movl    $1000, -16(%rbp)
    movl    $2000, -12(%rbp)
    movl    -16(%rbp), %eax
    cmpl    -12(%rbp), %eax
    jle .L2
    movl    $2, -8(%rbp)

and

    movl    -12(%rbp), %eax
    movl    -16(%rbp), %edx
    subl    %eax, %edx
    movl    %edx, %eax
    testl   %eax, %eax
    jle .L4
    movl    $3, -4(%rbp)

a - b > 0 needs one more step.

Note

  1. The above are compiled on Ubuntu 14.04 with gcc 4.8, with optimization turned off (-O0)
  2. As pointed out by @Blastfurnace, With -O2 or -O3, the assembly code are no longer readable. You need to profile to get a idea. But I believe they will be optimized to the same code.
  3. Who cares
share|improve this answer
1  
Since the question is about performance why would you turn off optimizations? – Blastfurnace Jun 22 '14 at 3:00
    
@Blastfurnace With -O2 or -O3, the above simple example optimized to nothing. Actually in my opinion, -O2 or -O3, the code would be no difference. Thanks for pointing that out. – gongzhitaao Jun 22 '14 at 3:02
1  
To try to prevent optimizing everything away you could read a and b from stdin and print c. Your third point is correct though. – Blastfurnace Jun 22 '14 at 3:06

If doing the subtract and testing the sign had the same result as the comparison and ran faster, the processor designers would have mapped the integer compare instruction to a subtract and test.

I think you can assume the compare is at least as fast as subtract and test, as well as having the really major advantage of being clearer.

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for readability, I always go with a > b

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