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I have been trying to learn neural networking and all the examples in saw on the internet gave examples of emulating logic gates say XOR gate. But what i want to do is create a network that can be trained to emulate functions say the x^2 or e^x. Is it possible? What changes in the network do i need to make? Here's my code for a neural network consisting of 1 input node, one hidden layer consisting of 3 nodes, and one output node.

    #include <iostream.h>
    #include <fstream.h>
    #include <math.h>
    #include <time.h>
    const double eeta=0.9;
    const int n=5;
    struct Net_elem
    {
       double weights1[3];
       double weights2[3];
       double bias1,bias2;
    };//structure to store network paramenters
     Net_elem net_elem;
     double sigma(double input)
     {
      return 1/(1+exp(-input));
      }
     void show_net_elem()
     {
                cout.precision(15);
               for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
               {
                       cout<<"weights1["<<i<<"]="<<net_elem.weights1[i];
                       cout<<endl;
               }
               for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
               {
                       cout<<"weights2["<<i<<"]="<<net_elem.weights2[i];
                       cout<<endl;
               }
               cout<<"bias1="<<net_elem.bias1<<" bias2="<<net_elem.bias2<<endl;
               system("pause");
               system("cls");
    }
     //function to train the network
    void train(double input,double expected)
    {
     double Output,output[3],Delta,delta[3],delta_bias1,delta_bias2;

     //Propogate forward
     double sum=0;
     for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
       output[i]=sigma(input*net_elem.weights1[i]+net_elem.bias1);
     sum=0;
     for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
       sum=sum+output[i]*net_elem.weights2[i];
     Output=sigma(sum+net_elem.bias2);
     cout<<"Output="<<Output<<endl;

     //Backpropogate

     Delta=expected-Output;
     for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
        delta[i]=net_elem.weights2[i]*Delta;
        delta_bias2=net_elem.bias2*Delta;

     //Update weights

     for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
       net_elem.weights1[i]=net_elem.weights1[i]+eeta*delta[i]*output[i]*(1-output[i])*input;
     for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
       net_elem.weights2[i]=net_elem.weights2[i]+eeta*Delta*Output*(1-Output)*output[i];
     net_elem.bias2=net_elem.bias2+eeta*delta_bias2;
     double sum1=0;
     for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
        sum1=sum1+net_elem.weights1[i]*delta[i];
     net_elem.bias1=net_elem.bias1+eeta*sum1;
     show_net_elem();
}
void test()
{
     cout.precision(15);
     double input,Output,output[3];
     cout<<"Enter Input:";
     cin>>input;
     //Propogate forward
     double sum=0;
     for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
       output[i]=sigma(input*net_elem.weights1[i]+net_elem.bias1);
     for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
       sum=sum+output[i]*net_elem.weights2[i];
     Output=sigma(sum+net_elem.bias2);
     cout<<"Output="<<Output<<endl;    
}

i have tried to run it to emulate the square root function.. but the output simply jumps between 0 and 1 alternatively.

Main:

int main()
{
    net_elem.weights1[0]=(double)(rand()%100+0)/10;
    net_elem.weights1[1]=(double)(rand()%100+0)/10;
    net_elem.weights1[2]=(double)(rand()%100+0)/10;
    net_elem.weights2[0]=(double)(rand()%100+0)/10;
    net_elem.weights2[1]=(double)(rand()%100+0)/10;
    net_elem.weights2[2]=(double)(rand()%100+0)/10;;
    net_elem.bias1=(double)(rand()%100+0)/10;
    net_elem.bias2=(double)(rand()%100+0)/10;
    double output[n],input[n];
    int ch;
    for(int i=1;i<n;i++)
    {
            input[i]=100;
            output[i]=sqrt(input[i]);
    }
    do
    {
            cout<<endl<<"1. Train"<<endl;
            cout<<"2. Test"<<endl;
            cout<<"3. Exit"<<endl;
            cin>>ch;
            switch(ch)
            {
                      case 1:for(int i=1;i<n;i++)
                      {
                            train(input[i],output[i]);
                      }
                            break;
                      case 2:test();break;
                      case 3:break;
                      default:cout<<"Enter Proper Choice"<<endl;
            }
     }while(ch!=3);
}
share|improve this question
1  
To know what changes need to be made, we need to know what we're changing. Can you show us an example of what you've attempted? –  christopher Jun 22 at 8:23
    
You teach your network that sqrt(100) = 10, right? First input[i] should depend upon i or a random value. Second I would try to train it massively. Thousands of training runs at least. Then you can ask yourself why it doesn't learn anything. Third I see some formatting problems. Is delta_bias2=net_elem.bias2*Delta; supposed to be inside the for loop? And fourth ... this is an all too obvious debugging question IMHO. –  TobiMcNamobi Jun 23 at 7:42

1 Answer 1

I think you are missing the point of using a neural network. Neural networks don't imitate known functions. They separate areas in an unknown vector space. The XOR problem is often given as an example, because it is the minimal non-linearly separable problem: A simple perceptron is simply a line separating two areas in you problem

enter image description here

In this case, the blue dots can be separated from the red dots using a simple line (the problem is linearly separable). However, in the XOR problem, the dots are situated like this:

enter image description here

Here, a single line (a perceptron) is not enough. However, a multi-layer perceptron (most probably the type of neural network you are using) can use multiple perceptrons, (in this case two) to separate the blue and red dots. In a similar manner, a neural network can separate any space.

However, the XOR problem produces two types of output, and we use a neural network to separate them. On the other hand, x^2 produces a continuous lines of points, so there's nothing to separate. Also, keep in mind that imitating the XOR function is given as an example of such problems. In practice, nobody ever uses a neural network to replace the XOR function. If you want to use a function, just use it, instead of building something that approximates it.

PS: If you still want to emulate the x^2 function for practice, you need regression. What you are doing is classification (since you are using a sigma function in you output). However, for practicing you'd better stick with classification problems. They are by far more common. Also, for such problems try Matlab, or, if you want to write in C++ use some linear algebra library (eg EIGEN 3) to make it easier writing without a thousand for loops.

share|improve this answer
    
"Neural networks don't imitate known functions." Sorry but I would have to strongly disagree, it has been proven for around 25 years that 2-layer perceptrons are universal approximators for any arbitrary continuous function. –  Dolma Jun 23 at 20:12
    
@Dolma: This is correct. However, this ability allows the network itself to create a generalized function for classification or regression in an unknown problem space. It is never used in practice to emulate a function that is already known to the user. The OP seems to ask why the XOR function is so often cited as an example, and I wanted to make clear how we can combine linear classifiers to classify non-linearly separable datasets, which is the beginning point for anyone new to neural networks. –  blue_note Jun 24 at 11:28
    
Yes you are absolutely right ! Although sometimes we do want to use known functions. For example to test generalisation capabilities of a network architecture and/or learning algorithm, we can use a known function, apply some random perturbations and then use the perturbed outputs to train the network in hopes that it fits the original unperturbed function. Other than that, I agree with you that it is not something you do much in practice ;) –  Dolma Jun 24 at 12:30

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