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There are hundreds of jQuery code snippets, trivial, arcane and sometimes wrong. Rarely is there a self contained complete example. Is this code using Crockford closures OK and correctly placed in the ready() function? If not, how should it be improved or fixed? Is this overkill? I'm trying to separate the user interface from the program logic which will eventually simulate a simple microcontroller. This example increments a Program Counter when the Step button is pressed. It works OK.

// ==================================================================
$(document).ready(function(){
    // ==============================================================
    // The simulator code - NO UI CODE HERE
    // ==============================================================
    var sim = (function(){
        // Private vars
        var pc = 0;    // Program Counter

        // Public functions
        return {
            step: function(){
                pc += 1;
                return pc;
            }
        }
    }());
    // ==============================================================
    // jQuery UI Code - NO SIMULATOR CODE HERE
    // ==============================================================
    var ui = (function($){
        // Private vars
        var step = $('#step'),    // <button id="step">Step</button>
            pc   = $("#pc");      // <p id="pc">Program Counter = 0</p>

        // Private functions
        step.click(function() {
            pc.html('Program Counter = ' + sim.step());
        });
    }(jQuery));
});
// ==================================================================
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What is a "Crockford Closure" (link please)? What is their purpose? –  Bergi Jun 24 at 12:55
    
Those module pattern IEFEs look a bit overkill for this trivial example, but if you're going to extend this code they are a very good start. –  Bergi Jun 24 at 12:55
    
"Crockford Closure" comes from the book, "JavaScript: The Good Parts" by Douglas Crockford. It is a coding style that allows better control over private and public data and it avoids some of the pitfalls of poorly written javaScript code. I'm planning a significant project and trying to get a good code structure from the start. –  nbauers Jun 24 at 13:58

2 Answers 2

Your code is very good example how application can be split between layers. I don’t like many indentions in the code - any intention seems to manage more logic.

Only o few changes

$(init); // shortcut for $(document).ready()

function init() {
    // ==============================================================
    // The simulator code - NO UI CODE HERE
    // ==============================================================
    var sim = (function(){
        // Private vars
        var pc = 0;    // Program Counter

        // Public functions
        return {
            step: function(){
                return pc += 1;
            }
        }
    }());
    // ==============================================================
    // jQuery UI Code - NO SIMULATOR CODE HERE
    // ==============================================================
    var ui = (function(sim){
        // Private vars
        var $step = $('#step'), // variable with $ to mark than it contain jQurey collection
            $pc   = $("#pc");

        // Private functions
        $step.click(function() {
            $pc.html('Program Counter = ' + sim.step());
        });
    }(sim)); // pass sim as dependency
}

Variation with init method

$(init);

function init() {
    var sim = simlulator();
    ui(sim);
}

function simlulator() {
    var pc = 0;

    return {
        step: function () {
            return pc += 1;
        }
    };
}

function ui(sim) {
    var $step = $('#step'),
        $pc = $("#pc");

    $step.click(function () {
        $pc.html('Program Counter = ' + sim.step());
    });
}

And some variation with two simulators: http://jsfiddle.net/vw9kN/

share|improve this answer
    
I like the "Variation with init method" very much. It's easier to read. Does this alteration make the simulator and ui functions global as they no longer reside inside the init function. Does this even matter as the instances that get used are inside the init function? –  nbauers Jun 23 at 9:48
    
simular and ui are global - you can avoid that by using namespaces. This is not an instance - this is shortcut for $(function() {init();}) –  Krzysztof Safjanowski Jun 23 at 11:08
    
@nbauers yes, the latter makes the functions global, so in general this is a bad idea. Your posted code, whilst slight overkill, has the advantage that it creates no new global variables. –  Alnitak Jun 24 at 12:51
    
@Alnitak you can wrap code with IFEE to avoid global variable creating. –  Krzysztof Safjanowski Jun 24 at 13:31
    
@KrzysztofSafjanowski yup, or just put them inside the body of a function that's gonna get called anyway, such as $(document).ready(...). –  Alnitak Jun 24 at 13:58

Based on this useful advice, here is a self-contained, complete and working version inside a namespace. It can be split into separate source code files easily but here the separate files are combined into one.

This is the quest for the "Holy Grail" of small-project, adequately structured, jQuery code, written so newbies might have some chance of understanding it and without a short cut for the .ready() function.

http://jsfiddle.net/nbauers/pu4bK/27/

Are we there yet?

// ==========================================
// Make a Name Space
// ==========================================
var myApp = myApp || {};
// ==========================================

// ==========================================
// simUI.js // User Interface Functionality
// ==========================================
myApp.ui = function (sim) {
    var $step     = $('#step'),        // A Button
        $assemble = $("#assemble"),    // A Button
        $source   = $("#source"),      // Source Text Area
        $lst      = $("#lst"),         // List Text Area
        $pc       = $("#pc");          // A Paragraph

    // ======================================
    // Single Step the Program
    // ======================================
    $step.click(function () {
        $pc.html('Program Counter = ' + sim.step());
    });
    // ======================================
    // Assemble the Source Code
    // ======================================
    $assemble.click(function () {
        $lst.val(sim.assemble($source.val()));
    });
    // ======================================
}
// ==========================================

// ==========================================
// simCore.js // Simulator Functionality
// ==========================================
myApp.simlulator = function() {
    var pc  = 0;

    var step = function () {
        return pc += 1;
    };

    var assemble = function(src) {
        step();
        return 'HELLO ' + pc + ' ' + src;
    };

    return {
        step:     step,        
        assemble: assemble
    };
}
// ==========================================

// ==========================================
// simInit.js // Initialise the environment
// ==========================================
myApp.init = function() {
    myApp.sim = myApp.simlulator();
    myApp.ui(myApp.sim);
}
// ==========================================
$(document).ready(function(){
    myApp.init();
});
// ==========================================
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