Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently got an assignment to write a code in C that determines if a list of words is sorted or not ("sorted"= all the words are in rising order of letters within the word) We have many guidelines we have to follow, so the end result is outright stupid, instead of a short and efficient code.

I am getting 2 errors with my code:

"Passing argument 1 of 'sortedsentance' makes pointer from integer without a cast"

expected 'char *' but argument is of type 'char'

Here is my code-

#include <stdio.h>
int sortedSentance(char *str)
{
    int i;
    for (i=1; str[i]!='0'; i++)
    {
        if ((str[i]>str[i-1])||(str[i]==33))
            continue;
        else
            break;
    }

    if (str[i]=='\0')
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}

int main()
{
    int num=0, val=0;
    char str1;

    printf("Please enter the number of strings of length 5 (maximum 5)\n");
    scanf("%d", &num);

    printf("Please enter %d strings\n", num);
    scanf("%s", &str1);

    val= (sortedSentance(str1));

    if (val==1)
        printf("the string %s, is sorted.", str1);
    else
        printf("the string %s, is not sorted.", str1);

    return 0;
}

Notes:

  1. Our guidelines press the function has to be declared like that, i know it should be done differently.
  2. I know the variable num doesn't do anything, but again, for the sake of the stupid guidelines. The algorithm does it's desired function even without actually receiving the number of words from beforehand.

Any help would be much appreciated, I'm already grasping my hairs trying to make sense of why doesn't this very simple code work, and what kind of stupid mistake could i have done.

share|improve this question
1  
FYI sortedSentance should by sortedSentence –  Lee Taylor Jun 22 at 15:18
3  
You declared char str1 as a single character. You cannot read multiple strings into one character. (And I am not sure you are in a position to call your guidelines "stupid" just yet.) –  DCoder Jun 22 at 15:23
    
I haven't seen your assignment, but for me something is wrong. If you are to check a list of words and get the num than why are you reading only one string ? –  prajmus Jun 22 at 15:41
    
The function name is copy pasted from the sheet. The spelling mistake is there originally (if i fix it- the automated checking system will mark it as a mistake and i'll get less points) ....and this is what i don't get as well, the input files we got for example separate the words by spaces, not by reading with a scanf for each and there enter. the num does pretty much nothing, since the program would work for any number of words separated by spaces regardless. I forgot to add a size by Define and include it there, will try and report back. –  user3764933 Jun 22 at 16:50

2 Answers 2

The problem is with your

char str1;

You try to use single char but in your function it accepts a pointer to a char array. This is the problem you have two options.

  1. char str1[100];//This 100 could be changed according to your needs

2.

char * str1 = new char[100];//This 100 could be changed according to your needs

Either will work and remember to calls delete [] operator on str1 in the second case.

Moreover, I did't looked at logical correctness of your program. Just resolved your compilation error.

P.S. Since the solution needs to be in C,

you may use

char * str1 = malloc(sizeof(char)*(100));
share|improve this answer
    
There's no new in C. –  DCoder Jun 22 at 15:26
    
@DCoder then use malloc and free –  Sargi Eran Jun 22 at 15:27

Instead of char str1; that is a holder for a single character you should allocate memory for a string, you can choose :

  • Static memory allocation : char str1[100];

  • Dynamic memory allocation : char *str1 = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char) * 100);

P.S. You don't have to pass to scanf the address of the string, because str1 is an address itself so write scanf("%s", str1); instead of scanf("%s", &str1);

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.