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I have he following scenario:

public abstract class Value<T> {
    public void Value add(Value v) {
       // Statements
    }
}

public class IntValue extends Value<String> {
    public void IntValue add(IntValue v) {
       // Statements
    }
}

And in another part of the code:

public void exec(Value a, Value b) {
     a.add(b);
}

My question is, why, knowing that a and b are instances of IntValue, the code executed is from their super class.

Thank you very much!

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9  
Because the method in IntValue is not an override of the method in Value; it has different argument types. And even if it was, overload selection is performed on the static types of arguments, not on the dynamic runtime types. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 22 at 16:13
1  
Because those method signatures are different, and you're calling the superclass method. –  bstar55 Jun 22 at 16:14
    
@OliCharlesworth you really understood what i meant to do. If you are kind enough to post it as a answer i will mark it a the correct one. Thanks to all of you folks! –  bgarate Jun 22 at 17:11

1 Answer 1

You have an example of method overloading (when you meant to use overriding). This is a good example of why you should use the @Override annotation. Also (I presume) your generic Value class should be generic on T

public abstract class Value<T> {
  public void Value<T> add(Value<T> v) {
   // Statements
  }
}

Adding the annotation you would get a compile error,

public class IntValue extends Value<Integer> {
  @Override
  public void IntValue add(IntValue v) {
   // Statements
  }
}
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