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I'm trying to create a for-loop which checks if a member of my char array is the ASCii value I'm looking for (a=97, d=100, g=103, and so on), and if it is, add 5 to an int value I have, however, my code isn't working but I can't figure out why

string str;
cin >> str;
int arrSize = str.size();

char arr[arrSize];
strcpy(arr, str.c_str());

int ans = 0;
for(int i = 0; i < arrSize; i++)
{
    if(arr[i] == 97 || 100 || 103 || 106 || 109){ ans+= 5; }
    else{ ans+= 3; }
}

cout << ans;

a gives me 5, but so does every other value (b,c,e,f,h,i...).

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1  
if(arr[i] == 'a' || arr[i] == 'd' || arr[i] == 'g' || arr[i] == 'j'|| arr[i] == 'm'){ ans+= 5; } It's more readable –  AdamF Jun 22 '14 at 16:38
1  
There is no need to copy the string. str[i] will do the same thing. –  ScottMcP-MVP Jun 22 '14 at 16:47
    
That's true, Scott –  matr Jun 22 '14 at 18:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
arr[i] == 97 || 100 || 103 || 106 || 109

This is wrong. It is equivalent to:

(arr[i] == 97) || (100) || (103) || (106) || (109)

Is 100 true? Yes, it is. Therefore, everything will be true.

Instead you want:

arr[i] == 97 || arr[i] == 100 || arr[i] == 103 || arr[i] == 106 || arr[i] == 109
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I didn't know it worked this way on C++, thanks. –  matr Jun 22 '14 at 16:47
    
@matr it works this way for most other languages. If some language has different precendence for == and || then it'll be treated as arr[i] == (97 || 100 || 103 || 106 || 109) so it won't work as you expected too –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Nov 7 '14 at 5:14

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