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I saw different articles about chain method, but I still don't understand the difference between "return $this" and "return $this->SomeVariable".I also want to know how a method call another method within and without the class too.

Could someone kindly explain it ? thanks you!

My example, it echo "bca", but I dont get why "a" is the last to display...

class validation {

    public function __construct($a) {
        $this->a = $a;
    }
    public function one($a) {
        echo $a = "b";
        return $this;
    }
    public function two($a) {
        echo $a = "c";
        return $this->a;
    }
}

$a = "a";
$NameErr = new validation($a);
echo $NameErr->one($a)->two($a);
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is returned from two($a) since it returns $this->a that is set in constructor as "a", and method one($a) returns instance of the object on which is then called function two.

$this refers to the object instance. So difference is that return $this->SomeVariable it just returns the variable.

Also just a nice coding tip. Declare $a in class as private variable like this:

 class Validation
 {
      private $a;
 }
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First let me say $this refers to the class you are in.

This way of coding is called fluent interface. return $this returns the current object,

 $NameErr->one($a)->two($a);

is same as

$NameErr->one($a);
$NameErr->two($a);

And in this case

First the method one() is called, thus the value b is printed and the object of the class is returned. Now method two() is called, the value c is echoed out and the property is returned, which is echoed out side the class.

ps: Declaring the variable $a as private would be a nice practice.

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