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I have numerous versions of packages installed. My base, system python is ~/Library/Enthought/Canopy_64bit/User/lib/python2.7/
but I also have an application ('yt') which installed its own python to
~/Applications/yt/yt-x86_64/lib/python2.7/

I've added the yt path so that I can import a module which it includes, when I run my system python. The problem is, when I add the yt-path to PYTHONPATH it adds a ton of other directories, to higher entries in my sys.path so that when I try to import numpy (for example), I end up getting the yt-version, instead of my system version.

Is there a way to keep my sys.path from being modified?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

PYTHONPATH values are always inserted in front of the standard python library paths in sys.path

One potential approach around this problem is to add the yt path to sys.path yourself.

So try

# append to the *end* of the system path.
sys.path.append('~/Applications/yt/yt-x86_64/lib/python2.7/path/to/libs')

this will put the yt specific modules at the end of the list, and your system's numpy will be found/imported first.

share|improve this answer
    
Other things I've added to PYTHONPATH seem to be appended to the end of sys.path --- it seems to be specifically this yt stuff that's changing the order around... I'm not sure. Anyway --- your idea to add the path specifically to the libs is great, and seems to be working! Thanks! – DilithiumMatrix Jun 23 '14 at 1:59
    
@zhermes - I'm not an expert on PYTHONPATH but it seems to go in the middle of sys.path, after eggs but before standard modules. – tdelaney Jun 23 '14 at 3:21

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