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In C# you can do this:

foo = string.Format("{0} {1} {2} {3} ...", "aa", "bb", "cc" ...);

This method Format() accepts infinite parameters, being the first one how the string should be formatted and the rest are values to be put in the string.

Today I've come to a situation where I had to get a set of strings and test them, then I remembered this language functionality, but I had no clue. After a few unsuccessful web searches, I've realised it would be more prudent to just get an array, which didn't make me quite satisfied.

Q: How do I make a function that accepts infinite parameters? And how do I use it ?

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1  
infinite...that's a lot of parameters. Have you tried it out? –  flq Mar 12 '10 at 20:48
3  
Pedant point, it isn't "infinite" by any means; but any sane code should be OK. –  Marc Gravell Mar 12 '10 at 20:51
1  
I would be surprised if anyone had infinite memory. I want some! –  Callum Rogers Mar 12 '10 at 22:05
1  
@Christian.K I think it's more clarifying like this, since it was my original question and might be more easily linked with similar doubts others might get. And (in a general way) this is a virtual way of creating overloads (if you put one of them wrong, visual studio complains by saying "none of the overloads accept these parameters" or something like this) –  Marcelo Mar 13 '10 at 23:43
1  
@MarceloRamires: I was trying to refer to the fact, that the "params" keyword, which is what the example you have given is all about, has as much todo with overloads as has any other parameterlist of a method, but rather allows a method to be called with an array of "infinite items". But seriously, it is your question, so by all means keep it like that if the title is stating what you intended to know/ask (I may have misunderstood then, fair enough :-) –  Christian.K Mar 14 '10 at 8:34

8 Answers 8

up vote 52 down vote accepted

With the params keyword.

Here is an example:

    public int SumThemAll(params int[] numbers)
    {
        return numbers.Sum();
    }

    public void SumThemAllAndPrintInString(string s, params int[] numbers)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format(s, SumThemAll(numbers)));
    }

    public void MyFunction()
    {
        int result = SumThemAll(2, 3, 4, 42);
        SumThemAllAndPrintInString("The result is: {0}", 1, 2, 3);
    }

The code shows various things. First of all the argument with the params keyword must always be last (and there can be only one per function). Furthermore, you can call a function that takes a params argument in two ways. The first way is illustrated in the first line of MyFunction where each number is added as a single argument. However, it can also be called with an array as is illustrated in SumThemAllAndPrintInString which calls SumThemAll with the int[] called numbers.

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1  
Mind to elaborate ? –  Marcelo Mar 12 '10 at 20:47
10  
@MarceloRamires: Click the link. I can't explain it better than the documentation anyway ;-) –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Mar 12 '10 at 20:47
3  
Actually you can; that explanation is just 2 lines plus an example. Not saying that the documentation isn't good enough, just saying that you could explain it better if you wanted to. –  Andreas Bonini Mar 12 '10 at 21:21
    
@MarceloRamires: string.Format("{0} {1} {2} {3}", "aa", "bb", "cc") looks like Format(params object[] args) where args = {"aa", "bb", "cc"}. Make sense? –  Pat Mar 12 '10 at 21:46
    
@MarceloRamires I have elaborated. Hope it makes sense. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Mar 25 '10 at 15:23

Use the params keyword. Usage:

public void DoSomething(int someValue, params string[] values)
{
    foreach (string value in values)
        Console.WriteLine(value);
}

The parameter that uses the params keyword always comes at the end.

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2  
And the infinite values should be in the end, right? if i wanted a single integer along with it, it MUST be in the beginning, right ? –  Marcelo Mar 12 '10 at 20:49
1  
@MarceloRamires - Correct, it must be on the end. –  Nick Craver Mar 12 '10 at 20:50
    
@MarceloRamiers - Your method would look like public void DoSomething(int myvalue, params string[] values) –  David Basarab Mar 12 '10 at 20:55

A few notes.

Params needs to be marked on an array type, like string[] or object[].

The parameter marked w/ params has to be the last argument of your method. Foo(string input1, object[] items) for example.

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use the params keyword. For example

static void Main(params string[] args)
{
    foreach (string arg in args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(arg);
    }
}
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Thanks but... "and how do i use it?" –  Marcelo Mar 12 '10 at 20:48

You can achieve this by using the params keyword.

Little example:

public void AddItems(params string[] items)
{
     foreach (string item in items)
     { 
         // Do Your Magic
     }
}
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    public static void TestStrings(params string[] stringsList)
    {
        foreach (string s in stringsList){ } 
            // your logic here
    }
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 public string Format(params string[] value)
 {
            // implementation
 }

The params keyword is used

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function void MyFunction(string format, params object[] parameters) {

}

Instad of object[] you can use any type your like. The params argument always has to be the last in the line.

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