Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a function that takes in an id of a div, checks that id against a list of other ids, displays the div relevant to the passed-in id, and causes all other divs for the ids in the list to not be displayed.

<script type="text/javascript">
function display_page(id) {
//list of ids that I want to check against
   var pages = ['home', 'about', 'listen', 'more']; 
    for (var i=0; i<pages.length; i++) {
        var e = document.getElementById(pages[i]);
        if (pages[i] == id){
            e.style.display = 'block';
            alert(e);
        } 
        else{
             e.style.display = 'none';  
            alert(e);
        }
    }
</script> 

And my function calls are structured like this:

<li class="active" class="test"><a href="#" onclick="display_page('home');">Home</a></li>

Not sure why this isn't working -- as a note, my ids are unique so I don't think that's the issue. The alerts are not showing up though upon clicking the relevant links (like the one posted above). Thanks for the help!

share|improve this question
    
where are the id(s) in your HTML code –  Satya Jun 23 '14 at 3:16
    
Any errors in console? –  Maulik Anand Jun 23 '14 at 3:23
    
Instead of display none/block, consider adding and removing a class. –  RobG Jun 23 '14 at 3:32
1  
is there a deep hatred or some other issue with jQuery , this can be done in one line of code . I'm not going to put it in answer because you did not use jQuery tag –  Scott Selby Jun 23 '14 at 3:58
1  
@ScottSelby—perhaps the OP would rather write 5 lines of code and have it run much faster, and not be dependent on 4,000 lines or so of other code. Greater or fewer lines of code is not, by itself, a reason to adopt any particular solution. –  RobG Jun 23 '14 at 4:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use querySelectorAll to help here:

function display_page(id) {

    var pages = document.querySelectorAll('#home, #about, #listen, #more');

    for (var i=0, iLen=pages.length; i<iLen; i++) {
      pages[i].style.display = pages[i].id == id? '' : 'none';
    }
}

I wonder when an iterator will be added to the NodeList interface so we can do:

var id = 'home';
document.querySelectorAll('#home, #about, #listen, #more').forEach(function(el) {
    el.style.display = el.id == id? '' : 'none';
});

Note that toggling between 'none' and '' (empty string) is preferred so that the element adopts its default or inherited style and you don't have to hard–code what that might be.

Oh, without qSA:

function display_page(id) {
    var ids = ['home', 'about', 'listen', 'more'];

    for (var i=0, iLen=ids.length; i<iLen; i++) {
      page = document.getElementById(ids[i]);
      page.style.display = page.id == id? '' : 'none';
    }
}

This one depends on ES5 forEach:

function display_page(showId) {
    ['home', 'about', 'listen', 'more'].forEach(function(id) {
        var page = document.getElementById(id);
        page.style.display = page.id == showId? '' : 'none';
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
This really helped see different approaches to solve what I was confused about -- figured it out now. Thanks! –  Lukida Jun 28 '14 at 5:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.