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I have a class like below

public class HintQuestion
{
    public string QuestionCode { get; set; }
    public string QuestionName { get; set; }
}

and another calss like below

public class User
{
    public User()
    {
        HintQuestion = new HintQuestion();
    }
    public HintQuestion HintQuestion { get; set; }
}

The problem is when I create an instance of User calss and assign values to inner class object it is not working. I am using object initialize

User u=new user{HintQuestion.QuestionCode  ="",...

But when I created constructors it's working fine.

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6  
I think you'd need to do User u = new user { HintQuestion = new HintQuestion { QuestionCode = "", QuestionName = "" } }; or User u = new user { HintQuestion = new HintQuestion() };. You could also try User u = new User { HintQuestion.QuestionCode = "", }; but I don't know if you'd get an NRE on that or not. By the way, having the same name variable name as a class name is confusing. – Tim Jun 23 '14 at 5:24
3  
@Tim I thought having property name as class name is a guideline. If you have only one property with that type. Atleast wpf and winform has many such cases: Visibility, CacheMode, ContextMenu. – Atomosk Jun 23 '14 at 5:30
    
@Atomosk - never worked in WPF, done very little in WinForms. A quick Google search seems to show WPF at least does that a lot. I still think it's a bad idea, but I'm just one voice of thousands :) – Tim Jun 23 '14 at 5:34
    
@Tim actually I was trying new User{HintQuestion.QuestionCode="" that was a typo in my question but was not woing – शेखर Jun 23 '14 at 5:37
    
@Șhȇkhaṝ - When you did new User { HintQuestion.QuestionCode="" did you get an error, and if so what was the error, or did it work? – Tim Jun 23 '14 at 5:40
    public class HintQuestion
    {
        public string QuestionCode { get; set; }
        public string QuestionName { get; set; }
    }

    public class User
    {
        public User()
        {
            this.HintQuestion = new HintQuestion();
        }
        public HintQuestion HintQuestion { get; set; }
    }


User u = new User { HintQuestion = new HintQuestion { QuestionCode = "test", QuestionName = "test1" } };
share|improve this answer
    
It'd be nice if you could add some dialog as to what was wrong so that it's an apparent solution. – ChiefTwoPencils Jun 28 '14 at 23:10

Using an object initializer you have to set the User.HintQuestion property the same way as you do in your constructor, assign a HintQuestion object to it, which you can also create using an initializer:

User u = new User {
    HintQuestion = new HintQuestion { QuestionCode = "", QuestionName = "" }
};
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