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class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        B b = new B();
        b.Run();
        Console.Read();
    }
}

class A
{
    public event Action onChanged;

    public void Raise()
    {
        if (onChanged != null)
            onChanged();
    }
}

class B
{
    public void Run()
    {
        A a = new A();
        a.onChanged += a_onChanged;
        a.Raise();
    }

    private void a_onChanged()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Wow! Invoked");
    }       

}

I am not able to figure out the Valid points which can justify that I broke encapsulation or may be otherwise. As per my understanding I am breaking encapsulation as a private method is getting called from another class, Is this enough for justifying that I broke on the laws of OOP. Need to gather some more inner concepts and descrption for the code above.

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FYI: Your event Action onChanged should be called Changed. The OnXxx is used for virtual methods that then raise the Xxx events. –  Jonathon Reinhart Jun 23 '14 at 5:45
    
Nothing is broken. You've wraped private method in a delegate class, which has public Invoke method. Your event calls public Invoke method of delegate, which calls method, which was passed to delegate at initialization time. –  Atomosk Jun 23 '14 at 5:50
    
"Oh, sorry... Did I break your encapsulation?" - (read in Samuel L. Jackson voice) –  sehe Jun 23 '14 at 6:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This really depends on why do you have a Raise method in class A.

If it there solely for enabling the access to a private member, then the answer would be: yes, your encapsulation has been compromised.
The onChanged event should occur when something has changed and not when some external class decides it should.

However, if this is only a simple snapshot for making a point, and the Raise event is a method that is triggering the event as a side effect to an action taken (something like changing text in a Textbox and then triggering onTextChanged) than your encapsulation is still in tact.

Note:

I am breaking encapsulation as a private method is getting called from another class

From Wikipedia:

Encapsulation is used to hide the values or state of a structured data object inside a class, preventing unauthorized parties' direct access to them. Publicly accessible methods are generally provided in the class (so-called getters and setters) to access the values, and other client classes call these methods to retrieve and modify the values within the object.

It is OK for the private method to be called from a public one. How else would it be called? It is up to you, the programmer, to get your methods logic straight and make sure that they call the appropriate methods.

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2  
+1 for If it there solely for enabling the access to a private member, then the answer would be: yes, your encapsulation has been compromised. Encapsulation is used to make sure that the object itself can control that it's behavior and state is valid. Allowing external parties to trigger state removes that control and can therefore make an object behave with undefined behaviour. –  jgauffin Jun 23 '14 at 6:20
    
@Avi - Not able to understand what are you tryiny to say here- "However, if this is only a simple snapshot for making a point, and the Raise event is a method that is triggering the event as a side effect to an action taken (something like changing text in a Textbox and then triggering onTextChanged) than your encapsulation is still in tact." –  Bose_geek Jun 23 '14 at 12:08
1  
@Bose_geek I mean that if this is not your actual code that raises the event, and the real code is more like the example of TextChanged, then your encapsulation is still in tact. If this is still not clear, let me know and I will post a demonstration. –  Avi Turner Jun 23 '14 at 13:01
    
@Avi - I got your point. I would be great if you can demostrate as well(just get crystal clear picture) that can show how in that case encapsulation remains intact. –  Bose_geek Jun 23 '14 at 13:35
    
@Bose_geek I posted a sample code. if any further clarification is required, please live a comment... –  Avi Turner Jun 23 '14 at 16:43

You didn't break encapulation on class B, since instances of B only modify themselves, but yes, you broke encapsulation on class A. Anything that has a reference to an instance of A can raise the onChanged event.

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2  
Events can only be subscribed to, there is no "modification" as such. Events are designed to work this way, and be publicly accessible if needed. I would consider encapsulation on an event to be broken only when an external class can raise the event. Which happens to be true in this case, irrespective of whether the onChanged field can be "modified" –  Xenolightning Jun 23 '14 at 6:24
    
Doh! You're correct! (Fixed!) –  LVBen Jun 23 '14 at 6:32

No, you did not break encapsulation and a private method is getting called from another class is not true in this case. Class B creates it's own A and calls it's Raise method which raises an onChanged event.
You are registering to this event from B therefore it's completely fine.

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