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I have written the following function which should log an array beginning at "0" and ending with the function's argument (in this case "40") to the console.

function range(num) {
    var holder = [];
    for(var i = 0; i <= num; i++) {
    holder.push(i);
    return holder;
    }
}
console.log(range(40));

This instead logs "undefined". I have noticed however, that removing the for loop's brackets like this:

function range(num) {
    var holder = [];
    for(var i = 0; i <= num; i++)
    holder.push(i);
    return holder;
}
console.log(range(40));

causes the function to work correctly, which is great except I do not understand why the function now works. Can anyone explain?

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1  
because return needs to be outside the brackets –  mplungjan Jun 23 at 8:02
    
because you only do a single iteration in your loop with your brackets –  BabyAzerty Jun 23 at 8:03
    
Proper indentation helps debugging code. The for without brackets only loops the holder.push() part. The return is only excecuted when the loop is done, as it should be. –  Cerbrus Jun 23 at 8:03
    
First time, you have return in for-loop, second time, return is out of for-loop. –  debute Jun 23 at 8:04
    
The first one shouldn't log undefined but [0]. –  deceze Jun 23 at 8:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The return needs to be outside the loop or it will leave the function after the first push

function range(num) {
  var holder = [];
  for(var i = 0; i <= num; i++) {
    holder.push(i);
  }
  return holder; // must be outside
}
console.log(range(40));

A SINGLE statement in a loop does not need brackets but it is recommended to have them anyway. Here is the above with a single statement.

function range(num) {
  var holder = [];
  for(var i = 0; i <= num; i++) holder.push(i);
  return holder; // must be outside
}
console.log(range(40));
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1  
Ah I see, so a for loop does not always require brackets. And I was returning the value before the loop was able to execute. Now that makes sense –  HelloWorld Jun 23 at 8:07

When you have brackets, you execute both the lines

for(var i = 0; i <= num; i++) 
{ 
holder.push(i);     // inside loop
return holder;      // inside loop
}

That means return after the first run and no further iterations take place.

When you don't have brackets you only execute the first line in the loop

for(var i = 0; i <= num; i++) 
holder.push(i);
return holder;    // this is outside loop

That's why without brackets all your push statements execute, with brackets it happens only once because you return immediately.

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Because now your code reads:

for( var i=0; i<=num; i++) {
    holder.push(i);
}
return holder;

A for loop (or if statement, while loop, etc) with no braces affects only the next line.

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You are returning within the for loop, which means it only run once.

When you remove the brackets, it automatically takes the next line as the loop, which mean the return statement is now outside the loop.

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In your first code you quit the function at the first loop:

function range(num) {

var holder = []; //1
for(var i = 0; i <= num; i++) { //2
    holder.push(i); //3
    return holder; //4 goes out  of range function, instead, you should use a "break"
    }
}
console.log(range(40));

While you are not putting brackets for a for loop, if condition, etc. , the "brackets" goes by default only for the FIRST line below :

This :

function range(num) {

var holder = [];
for(var i = 0; i <= num; i++)
    holder.push(i);
    return holder;
}
console.log(range(40));

, looks like this :

function range(num) {

var holder = [];
for(var i = 0; i <= num; i++) {
    holder.push(i);
}
    return holder;
}
console.log(range(40));
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