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class Base
{
    public:
    int base_int;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
    public:
    int derived_int
};

Base* basepointer = new Derived();
basepointer-> //Access derived_int here, is it possible? If so, then how?
share|improve this question
3  
Do you really mean to use private inheritance? – anon Mar 12 '10 at 21:53
1  
Someone add a statement terminator to it.I change just one character. – Fahad Uddin Apr 16 '11 at 13:25
up vote 25 down vote accepted

No, you cannot access derived_int because derived_int is part of Derived, while basepointer is a pointer to Base.

You can do it the other way round though:

Derived* derivedpointer = new Derived;
derivedpointer->base_int; // You can access this just fine

Derived classes inherit the members of the base class, not the other way around.

However, if your basepointer was pointing to an instance of Derived then you could access it through a cast:

Base* basepointer = new Derived;
static_cast<Derived*>(basepointer)->derived_int; // Can now access, because we have a derived pointer

Note that you'll need to change your inheritance to public first:

class Derived : public Base
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shouldn't he use dynamic_cast instead of static_cast? – NG. Mar 12 '10 at 22:09
8  
That depends whether or not he knows that it is a Derived or not. If you are 100% sure (as we are here) then static_cast is fine. – Peter Alexander Mar 12 '10 at 22:14
    
doesn't everyone mean reinterpret_cast instead of static_cast? I'm pretty sure static_cast won't compile. – Balk Mar 16 '12 at 14:42

You're dancing on the minefield here. The base class can never know that it's actually an instance of the derived. The safest way to do that would be to introduce a virtual function in the base:

class Base 
{ 
protected:
 virtual int &GetInt()
 {
  //Die horribly
 }

public: 
 int base_int; 
}; 

class Derived : Base 
{ 
  int &GetInt()
  {
    return derived_int;
  }
public: 
int derived_int 
}; 

basepointer->GetInt() = 0;

If basepointer points as something other that a Derived, your program will die horribly, which is the intended result.

Alternatively, you can use dynamic_cast(basepointer). But you need at least one virtual function in the Base for that, and be prepared to encounter a zero.

The static_cast<>, like some suggest, is a sure way to shoot yourself in the foot. Don't contribute to the vast cache of "unsafety of the C language family" horror stories.

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"Alternatively, you can use dynamic_cast(basepointer). But you need at least one virtual function in the Base for that, and be prepared to encounter a zero." --> Good Point Seva.Liked It :) – mahesh Apr 16 '10 at 8:58
1  
Using static_cast is not a way to shoot yourself in the foot. I think you're confusing it with C's explicit cast notation (T)x. static_cast on the other hand is type safe, but dynamic_cast will return a null pointer if it can't convert while static_cast will issue a compiler error. – 0x499602D2 Jun 7 '15 at 21:06

you can use CRTP

you basically use the derived class in the template for the base class

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It is possible by letting the base class know the type of derived class. This can be done by making the base class a template of derived type. This C++ idiom is called curiously recurring template pattern.

Knowing the derived class, the base class pointer can be static-casted to a pointer to derived type.

template<typename DerivedT>
class Base
{
public:
    int accessDerivedField()
    {
        auto derived = static_cast<DerivedT*>(this);
        return derived->field;
    }
};


class Derived : public Base<Derived>
{
public:
    int field;
};

int main()
{
    auto obj = new Derived;
    obj->accessDerivedField();
}
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