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As stated in the title, the program is working on my local machine (ubuntu 9.10) but not on the server (linux). It's a grid hosting hosting package of godaddy.

Please help..

Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    long offset;
    FILE *io;
    unsigned char found;
    unsigned long loc;

    if (argc != 2)
    {
        printf("syntax: find 0000000\n");
        return 255;
    }

    offset = atol(argv[1]) * (sizeof(unsigned char)+sizeof(unsigned long));

    io = fopen("index.dat","rb");
    fseek(io,offset,SEEK_SET);
    fread(&found,sizeof(unsigned char),1,io);
    fread(&loc,sizeof(unsigned long),1,io);

    if (found == 1)
        printf("%d\n",loc);
    else
        printf("-1\n");

    fclose(io);

    return 0;
}

EDIT: It's not my program. I wish I knew enough C in order to fix it, but I'm on a deadline. This program is meant to find the first occurrence of a 7 digit number in the PI sequence, index.dat contains an huge array number => position.

http://jclement.ca/fun/pi/search.cgi

EDIT 2: I've used the updated code with the test for null pointer, still getting the same results. The program is working fine on my local machine, this error only happens on the server.

share|improve this question
    
what is the fault message? which line fails? –  Vlad Mar 12 '10 at 21:53
3  
maybe file is not there, so fopen returns NULL? –  Vlad Mar 12 '10 at 21:54
3  
Why are you multiplying the parameter by (sizeof(long)+sizeof(char)) to give you the offset?... that would get you past the end of the file if the call to fopen worked - Have you actually verified that first...what if the parameter was 1234567???? Oh yeah, check for NULL when opening up the file first before proceeding.... –  t0mm13b Mar 12 '10 at 21:57
    
Another thing you mentioned there in the comments below...you uploaded it to a server, the filenames on the server could be case sensitive also? Index.DAT is case sensitive to index.dat....check first.... –  t0mm13b Mar 12 '10 at 22:03
    
The filename is exactly as in the code. –  Menachem Almog Mar 12 '10 at 22:12

11 Answers 11

The most likely thing is that the fopen is failing - you're not checking its return value to see if you actually got a valid pointer. (You get a segfault when you try to use that NULL pointer in the next line.)

share|improve this answer
1  
if (io==NULL) {fputs ("File error",stderr); exit (1);} –  Mac Mar 12 '10 at 22:10
    
I've added error checking for the null pointer with the same results. –  Menachem Almog Mar 12 '10 at 22:56

Maybe the sizes of unsigned long are not the same on the machines.

What does the following program print on your machines?

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf("%zu\n", sizeof(unsigned long));
    return 0;
}

Compile with gcc -std=c99 file.c. If the sizes printed are indeed different, then you need to replace unsigned long by uint32_t, and add #include <inttypes.h> at the beginning of your program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)

{
    long offset;
    FILE *io;
    unsigned char found;
    uint32_t loc;

    if (argc != 2)
    {
        printf("syntax: find 0000000\n");
        return 255;
    }
    /* sizeof(unsigned char) is 1, and I am assuming you wanted
       sizeof(unsigned long) to be 4.  But see below. */
    offset = strtol(argv[1], NULL, 0) * (1+4);

    if ((io = fopen("index.dat", "rb")) == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Cannot open file\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    if (fseek(io, offset, SEEK_SET) == -1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error seeking\n");
        perror(NULL);
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    if (fread(&found, 1, 1, io) != 1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error in first fread\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    /* using sizeof loc makes sure that the correct size if always used,
       irrespective of the type of loc */
    if (fread(&loc, sizeof loc, 1, io) != 1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error in second fread\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    if (found == 1)
        printf("%" PRIu32 "\n", loc);
    else
        printf("-1\n");
    fclose(io);

    return 0;
}

The above assumes that the "correctly working" program has 4 byte unsigned long. If not, you will need to replace the 4 in the program with whatever the size of unsigned long on the correct computer is.

If this is the reason of the difference, then you now know one of the problems with reading and writing binary data: you have to be very careful about sizes, endianness, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
This is even better than the quick debugging I recommended. This is the correct way to resolve the issue. No guessing and it improves the software. –  Dave Jarvis Mar 12 '10 at 23:51
    
I've tried compiling the file.c code, but it didn't compile for some reason. Anyway I've compiled the revised code and I get the same results: it's working on my local machine but "Segmentation fault" on the server. –  Menachem Almog Mar 13 '10 at 0:33
    
@menachem-almog: did you compile with gcc -std=c99? –  Alok Singhal Mar 13 '10 at 0:35
    
@Alok: He says it segfaults before the "long offset" declaration. My first thought was that there could be hardware differences between the server and workstation. –  Dave Jarvis Mar 13 '10 at 0:42
2  
@menachem-almog: are you compiling the program that runs on the server on the server? You aren't copying the program over from the workstation, right? –  Fred Mar 13 '10 at 4:08

My initial guess is that the file failed to open, and thus io is NULL.

But Wade is right: you should add some error handling to your program first - at minimum that will give you (and us) a better idea of what is going wrong.

share|improve this answer

My guess would be that sizeof(long) on the server is 8 (due to it being a 64-bit system), vs. 4 on your local machine (assuming a 32-bit machine). Thus your calculated offset into the file would be wrong by a factor of 2. If you need to go to a specific offset in the file, you should be using fixed-size types - i.e. uint32_t and the like.

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I just ran into this problem with godaddy and found that the FTP client was uploading in ASCII and not Binary. I changed the extension to .bin before uploading and it works normally now.

share|improve this answer

First, you've given us no context on where the error occurs.

Second, before people spend time on it you need to add error checking.

share|improve this answer
1  
This isn't an answer. It's a comment. –  Jefromi Mar 12 '10 at 21:55
    
Specifically, check that the file was actually opened, and perhaps that it is long enough. Maybe print out that offset to determine it is what you expect it to be. –  kwatford Mar 12 '10 at 21:56

Maybe "index.dat" isn't on your server but is on your machine. Since you're opening it with "rb" and not checking io after the fopen that could very well do it.

share|improve this answer
    
Or perhaps your local machine is case-insensitive and the file is named Index.dat. –  wadesworld Mar 12 '10 at 21:57
    
I've uploaded the entire directory as is. –  Menachem Almog Mar 12 '10 at 21:59
    
@Wade: The local machine is Ubuntu, which is a Linux distro, and hence the file names are case-sensitive. –  David Thornley Mar 12 '10 at 22:11
    
@David - whoops my bad. I misread it and thought Ubuntu was the server. –  wadesworld Mar 12 '10 at 22:15

Can you run gdb on the server? If so, build with debugging enabled (-g option to gcc) and run it in gdb. That will tell you where the program is failing. Here's how (replace the stuff in <> with the relevant info):

# gdb <program>

(gdb) set args <arg>
(gdb) run

gdb will catch the segfault and show the line where it crashed.

share|improve this answer
    
Newbie programmer. Alok's answer is probably the most correct here. –  Dave Jarvis Mar 12 '10 at 23:53
    
I can't run gdb on the server. –  Menachem Almog Mar 13 '10 at 0:34

I think you are reading outside the file limits. I added a portion to check the file size and ensure you are reading within the file limits.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    long offset;
    FILE *io;
    unsigned char found;
    unsigned long loc;

    if (argc != 2)
    {
        printf("syntax: find 0000000\n");
        return 255;
    }

    offset = atol(argv[1]) * (sizeof(unsigned char)+sizeof(unsigned long));

    io = fopen("index.dat","rb");
if (io==NULL) {fputs ("File error",stdout); exit (1);}
fseek (io , 0 , SEEK_END);
long fileSize = ftell (io);
long offsetEnd = offset+sizeof(unsigned char)+sizeof(unsigned long);
printf("file size: %d\nseek: %d\nseekEnd: %d\n",fileSize,offset,offsetEnd);

if (offsetEnd> fileSize) {fputs ("Reading outside of file...",stdout); exit (1);}

    fseek(io,offset,SEEK_SET);
    fread(&found,sizeof(unsigned char),1,io);
    fread(&loc,sizeof(unsigned long),1,io);

    if (found == 1)
        printf("%d\n",loc);
    else
        printf("-1\n");

    fclose(io);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Change the middle section of your code to:

fseek(io,offset,SEEK_SET);
printf("fseek worked\n");
fread(&found,sizeof(unsigned char),1,io);
printf("fread 1 worked\n");
fread(&loc,sizeof(unsigned long),1,io);
printf("fread 2 worked\n");

and see which lines get printed when you run the program. That should give you a hint as to where exactly the problem is.

Edit: When I say a function call "worked", I mean "didn't cause a segfault". Ideally you would want to check each call to fseek and fread to make sure they didn't encounter any errors, but you mentioned you were on a deadline so this is just some quick-n-dirty error tracing to try and track down the segfault.

share|improve this answer
1  
I wouldn't say that successfully reaching the next line indicates that fseek or fread "worked" - you need to check the return value to determine that. –  Andrew Medico Mar 12 '10 at 23:16
    
fseek returns -1 in the case of failure. –  Alok Singhal Mar 13 '10 at 0:43
    
@Andrew,Alok: True. I was writing this as something that was easy to add and understand for someone not familiar with the C language (as the OP admitted). I agree that the return from fseek should be checked and the code should verify that there is enough file left to fread after the fseek, but I was trying to keep it simple for a novice on a deadline. And by "worked", I mean "didn't cause a segfault". –  bta Mar 15 '10 at 17:12

Maybe you should try and allocate some memory for found and loc variables ?

share|improve this answer
    
found and loc are on the stack. –  wadesworld Mar 12 '10 at 21:54

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