Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a single-threaded client/server application that needs to do both encryption and decryption of their network communication. I plan on using OpenSSL's EVP API and AES-256-CBC.

Some sample pseudo-code I found from a few examples:

// key is 256 bits (32 bytes) when using EVP_aes_256_*()
// I think iv is the same size as the block size, 128 bits (16 bytes)...is it?
1: EVP_CIPHER_CTX *ctx = EVP_CIPHER_CTX_new();
2: EVP_CipherInit_ex(ctx, EVP_aes_256_cbc(), NULL, key, iv, 1); //0=decrypt, 1=encrypt
3: EVP_CipherUpdate(ctx, outbuf, &outlen, inbuf, inlen);
4: EVP_CipherFinal_ex(ctx, outbuf + outlen, &tmplen));
5: outlen += tmplen;
6: EVP_CIPHER_CTX_cleanup(ctx);
7: EVP_CIPHER_CTX_free(ctx);

The problem is from all these examples, I'm not sure what needs to be done at every encryption/decryption, and what I should only do once on startup.

Specifically:

  • At line 1, do I create this EVP_CIPHER_CTX just once and keep re-using it until the application ends?
  • Also at line 1, can I re-use the same EVP_CIPHER_CTX for both encryption and decryption, or am I supposed to create 2 of them?
  • At line 2, should the IV be re-set at every packet I'm encrypting? Or do I set the IV just once, and then let it continue forever?
  • What if I'm encrypting UDP packets, where a packet can easily go missing or be received out-of-order: am I correct in thinking CBC wont work, or is this where I need to reset the IV at the start of every packet I send out?
share|improve this question

migrated from crypto.stackexchange.com Jun 23 at 12:13

This question came from our site for software developers, mathematicians and others interested in cryptography.

3  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about using a cryptographic library (e.g. Crypto++, OpenSSL etc) and using it in your application. –  otus Jun 22 at 20:19
    
If crypto.stackexchange.com cannot be used to ask OpenSSL-specific questions, can an admin please migrate this question to stackoverflow instead? –  Stéphane Jun 22 at 22:44
1  
@Stéphane I just pinged the mods to inform them about your migration request. (By the way: you can always “flag” your own question and choose “other (needs ♦ moderator attention)”. That way, you can inform moderators that a question needs their intervention/help/etc. Just in case you weren’t aware of that fact yet…) –  e-sushi Jun 23 at 7:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I have a single-threaded client/server application that needs to do both encryption and decryption of their network communication. I plan on using OpenSSL's EVP API and AES-256-CBC.

If you are using the SSL_* functions from libssl, then you will likely never touch the EVP_* APIs.


At line 1, do I create this EVP_CIPHER_CTX just once and keep re-using it until the application ends?

You create it once per use. That is, as you need to encrypt, you use the same context. If you need to encrypt a second stream, you would use a second context. If you needed to decrypt a third stream, you would use a third context.


Also at line 1, can I re-use the same EVP_CIPHER_CTX for both encryption and decryption, or am I supposed to create 2 of them?

No, see above.

The ciphers will have different states.


At line 2, should the IV be re-set at every packet I'm encrypting? Or do I set the IV just once, and then let it continue forever?

No. You set the IV once and then forget about it. That's part of the state the context object manages for the cipher.


What if I'm encrypting UDP packets, where a packet can easily go missing or be received out-of-order: am I correct in thinking CBC wont work...

If you are using UDP, its up to you to detect these sorts of problems. You'll probably end up reinventing TCP.

Encryption alone is usually not enough. You also need to ensure authenticity and integrity. You don't operate on data that's not authentic. That's what keeps getting SST/TLS and SSH in trouble.

For example, here's the guy who wrote the seminal paper on authenticated encryption with respect to IPSec, SSL/TLS and SSH weighing in on the Authenticate-Then-Encrypt (EtA) scheme used by SSL/TLS: Last Call: (Encrypt-then-MAC for TLS and DTLS) to Proposed Standard:

The technical results in my 2001 paper are correct but the conclusion regarding SSL/TLS is wrong. I assumed that TLS was using fresh IVs and that the MAC was computed on the encoded plaintext, i.e. Encode-Mac-Encrypt while TLS is doing Mac-Encode-Encrypt which is exactly what my theoretical example shows is insecure.

For authenticity, you should forgo CBC mode and switch to GCM mode. GCM is an authenticated encryption mode, and it combines confidentiality and authenticity into one mode so you don't have to combine primitives (like AES/CBC with an HMAC).


or is this where I need to reset the IV at the start of every packet I send out?

No, you set the IV once and then forget about it.


The problem is from all these examples, I'm not sure what needs to be done at every encryption/decryption, and what I should only do once on startup.

  1. Create this once: EVP_CIPHER_CTX
  2. Call this once for setup: EVP_CipherInit
  3. Call this as many times as you'd like: EVP_CipherUpdate
  4. Call this once for cleanup: EVP_CipherFinal

The OpenSSL wiki has quite a few examples of using the EVP_* interfaces. See EVP Symmetric Encryption and Decryption, EVP Authenticated Encryption and Decryption and EVP Signing and Verifying.

All the examples use the same pattern: Init, Update and then Final. It does not matter if its encryption or hashing.


Related: this should be of interest to you: EVP Authenticated Encryption and Decryption. Its sample code from the OpenSSL wiki.


Related: you can find copies of Viega, Messier and Chandra's Network Security with OpenSSL online. You might consider hunting down a copy and getting familiar with some of its concepts.

share|improve this answer
    
That's some sound and extensive advice, I would suggest to Stephane to accept it. –  owlstead Jul 13 at 12:56

Sorry for reviving an old thread, but I noticed the following error in the accepted answer:

At line 1, do I create this EVP_CIPHER_CTX just once and keep re-using it until the application ends?

You create it once per use. That is, as you need to encrypt, you use the same context. If you need to encrypt a second stream, you would use a second context. If you needed to decrypt a third stream, you would use a third context.

Also at line 1, can I re-use the same EVP_CIPHER_CTX for both encryption and decryption, or am I supposed to create 2 of them?

No, see above.

This is not necessary. From the man page for OpenSSL:

New code should use EVP_EncryptInit_ex(), EVP_EncryptFinal_ex(), EVP_DecryptInit_ex(), EVP_DecryptFinal_ex(), EVP_CipherInit_ex() and EVP_CipherFinal_ex() because they can reuse an existing context without allocating and freeing it up on each call.

In other words, you need to re-initialize the context each time before you use it, but you can certainly use the same context over and over again without creating (allocating) a new one.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.