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I am developing a package which contains a plotting function that uses ggplot2. I want to change the colours for the default scales, but without affecting the global environment. I am assigning a new function for scale_colour_continuous, with a new set of default colours.

library(ggplot2)
dat      <- data.frame(a = 1:5, b = 1:5)
home.plot <- function(x){
scale_colour_continuous  <- function(...) ggplot2::scale_colour_continuous(..., low = "purple", high = "green")
ggplot(dat, aes(x = a, y = b)) + geom_point(aes(colour = a), size = 10)
}

home.plot(dat)

This does not work and the colours are not changed from black and blue to purple and green. I guess it is because ggplot2 looks for the scale_colour_continuous() function outside of the environment of the home.plot function.

If we try the same but in the global environment it works:

scale_colour_continuous  <- function(...) ggplot2::scale_colour_continuous(..., low = "purple", high = "green")
ggplot(dat, aes(x = a, y = b)) + geom_point(aes(colour = a), size = 10)

But this changes the behaviour of ggplot for all subsequent plots and not just those that are created by home.plot.

I am aware that I can change the colours after the ggplot object has been created by + scale_colour_continuous(), but home.plot does not know if the user plotted a discrete or continuous variable and I therefore need to change the behaviour of the scales before the ggplot object is created.

Any help is appreciated.

share|improve this question
dat      <- data.frame(a = 1:5, b = 1:5)
home.plot <- function(x,y=1){

  gg <- ggplot(dat, aes(x = a, y = b)) + 
     geom_point(aes(colour = a), size = 10)
  if(y==1){
    gg <- gg+scale_colour_gradient(low="purple", high="green")
  }else{
    gg <- gg+scale_colour_gradientn(colours=c("red","yellow",
                                              "green","cyan","blue"))
  }
  return(gg)
}

home.plot(dat)

enter image description here

home.plot(dat,2)

enter image description here

This should work. For 2 colors you can use gradient, bur for multiple you need gradientn

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. I would prefer avoiding the if else solution. In the package I am plotting fairly complex plots with several layers and scales, and they would require a substantial amount of if()s. – Anton Grau Jun 23 '14 at 13:24
    
"if" is just to show possibilities, you can skip it and have just purple-green gradient – Pigeon Jun 23 '14 at 13:27
    
I am sorry if it is unclear what I intend to accomplish. As I wrote in the post above, I am aware that I can change the scale after the object is created by ggplot. This is not flexible enough, because I do not know the character of the input variables in my plotting function. They could be numeric vectors and factors. – Anton Grau Jun 23 '14 at 13:51

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