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If I have some R list mylist, you can append an item obj to it like so:

mylist[[length(mylist)+1]] <- obj

But surely there is some more compact way. When I was new at R, I tried writing lappend() like so:

lappend <- function(lst, obj) {
    lst[[length(lst)+1]] <- obj
    return(lst)
}

but of course that doesn't work due to R's call-by-name semantics (lst is effectively copied upon call, so changes to lst are not visible outside the scope of lappend(). I know you can do environment hacking in an R function to reach outside the scope of your function and mutate the calling environment, but that seems like a large hammer to write a simple append function.

Can anyone suggest a more beautiful way of doing this? Bonus points if it works for both vectors and lists.

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2  
R has the immutable data characteristics that are often found in functional languages, hate to say this, but I think you just have to deal with it. It has its pros and its cons –  Dan Mar 14 '10 at 0:15
    
When you say "call-by-name" you really mean "call-by-value", right? –  Ken Williams Mar 15 '10 at 17:54
3  
No, it's definitely not call-by-value, otherwise this wouldn't be a problem. R actually uses call-by-need (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaluation_strategy#Call_by_need). –  Nick Mar 18 '10 at 1:56
    
Thanks for this lappend, it's just what I needed! –  Chris Beeley Oct 4 '11 at 14:17
    
A good idea is to pre-allocate your vector/list: N = 100 mylist = vector('list', N) for (i in 1:N) { #mylist[[i]] = ... } Avoid 'growing' objects in R. –  Fernando Sep 9 '12 at 19:46
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10 Answers

up vote 89 down vote accepted

Just use the c() function :

R> LL <- list(a="tom", b="dick")
R> c(LL, c="harry")
$a
[1] "tom"

$b
[1] "dick"

$c
[1] "harry"

R> class(LL)
[1] "list"
R> 

That works on vectors too, so do I get the bonus points?

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8  
This doesn't append... it concatenates. LL would still have two elements after C(LL, c="harry") is called. –  Nick Mar 13 '10 at 6:29
9  
Just reassign to LL: LL <- c(LL, c="harry"). –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Mar 13 '10 at 11:52
25  
This only works with strings. If a, b and c are integer vectors, the behavior is completely different. –  Alexandre Rademaker Dec 13 '10 at 17:14
2  
Good find @AlexandreRademaker. The badness of c(list(a=3, b=c(4, 5)), c=c(6, 7)) is staggering. –  j_random_hacker Dec 4 '11 at 14:12
8  
@Dirk: You have the parens nested differently than I do. My call to c() has 2 arguments: the list I'm trying to append to, namely list(a=3, b=c(4, 5)), and the item I'm trying to append, namely c=c(6, 7). If you use my approach, you'll see that 2 list items are appended (6 and 7, with names c1 and c2) instead of a single 2-element vector named c as is clearly intended! –  j_random_hacker Dec 5 '11 at 16:45
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In the Lisp we did it this way:

> l <- c(1)
> l <- c(2, l)
> l <- c(3, l)
> l <- rev(l)
> l
[1] 1 2 3

though it was 'cons', not just 'c'. If you need to start with an empy list, use l <- NULL.

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1  
Excellent! All the other solutions return some weird list of lists. –  kermit666 Nov 7 '13 at 13:16
    
l <- c(l, 2) works without the need for rev(l) –  flies Jun 26 at 20:28
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If you pass in the list variable as a quoted string, you can reach it from within the function like:

push <- function(l, x) {
  assign(l, append(eval(as.name(l)), x), envir=parent.frame())
}

so:

> a <- list(1,2)
> a
[[1]]
[1] 1

[[2]]
[1] 2

> push("a", 3)
> a
[[1]]
[1] 1

[[2]]
[1] 2

[[3]]
[1] 3

> 

or for extra credit:

> v <- vector()
> push("v", 1)
> v
[1] 1
> push("v", 2)
> v
[1] 1 2
> 
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This is basically the behavior that I want, however it still calls append internally, resulting in O(n^2) performance. –  Nick Mar 13 '10 at 6:31
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Not sure why you don't think your first method won't work. You have a bug in the lappend function: length(list) should be length(lst). This works fine and returns a list with the appended obj.

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1  
You are absolutely right. There was a bug in the code and I've fixed it. I've tested the lappend() that I've provided and it seems to perform about as well as c() and append(), all of which exhibit O(n^2) behavior. –  Nick Sep 21 '10 at 16:51
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You want something like this maybe?

> push <- function(l, x) {
   lst <- get(l, parent.frame())
   lst[length(lst)+1] <- x
   assign(l, lst, envir=parent.frame())
 }
> a <- list(1,2)
> push('a', 6)
> a
[[1]]
[1] 1

[[2]]
[1] 2

[[3]]
[1] 6

It's not a very polite function (assigning to parent.frame() is kind of rude) but IIUYC it's what you're asking for.

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I think what you want to do is actually pass by reference (pointer) to the function-- create a new environment (which are passed by reference to functions) with the list added to it:

listptr=new.env(parent=globalenv())
listptr$list=mylist

#Then the function is modified as:
lPtrAppend <- function(lstptr, obj) {
    lstptr$list[[length(lstptr$list)+1]] <- obj
}

Now you are only modifying the existing list (not creating a new one)

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This appears to have quadratic time complexity again. The problem is obviously that list/vector resize is not implemented in the way it is usually implemented in most languages. –  leden Aug 31 '11 at 22:12
    
Yes-- looks like the appending at the end is very slow-- probably b/c lists are recursive, and R is best at vector operations rather than loop type operations. Its much better to do: –  DavidM Sep 1 '11 at 16:21
1  
system.time(for(i in c(1:10000) mylist[i]=i) (a few seconds), or better yet do it all in one operation: system.time(mylist=list(1:100000)) (less than a second), then modifying that preallocated list with the for loop will also be faster. –  DavidM Sep 1 '11 at 16:38
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> LL<-list(1:4)

> LL

[[1]]
[1] 1 2 3 4

> LL<-list(c(unlist(LL),5:9))

> LL

[[1]]
 [1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
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1  
I don't think this is the kind of appending the OP was looking for. –  joran Dec 3 '11 at 1:55
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This is a straightforward way to add items to an R List:

# create an empty list:
small_list = list()

# now put some objects in it:
small_list$k1 = "v1"
small_list$k2 = "v2"
small_list$k3 = 1:10

# retrieve them the same way:
small_list$k1
# returns "v1"

# "index" notation works as well:
small_list["k2"]

Or programmatically:

kx = paste(LETTERS[1:5], 1:5, sep="")
vx = runif(5)
lx = list()
cn = 1

for (itm in kx) { lx[itm] = vx[cn]; cn = cn + 1 }

print(length(lx))
# returns 5
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This isn't really appending. What if I have 100 objects and I want to append them to a list programmatically? R has an append() function, but it's really a concatenate function and it only works on vectors. –  Nick Mar 13 '10 at 1:45
    
append() works on vectors and lists, and it is a true append (which is basically the same as concatenate, so I don't see what your problem is) –  hadley Mar 13 '10 at 3:31
5  
An append function should mutate an existing object, not create a new one. A true append would not have O(N^2) behavior. –  Nick Mar 13 '10 at 6:30
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try this function lappend

lappend <- function (lst, ...){
  lst <- c(lst, list(...))
  return(lst)
}

and other suggestions from this page Add named vector to a list

Bye.

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in fact there is a subtelty with the c() function. If you do:

x <- list()
x <- c(x,2)
x = c(x,"foo")

you will obtain as expected:

[[1]]
[1]

[[2]]
[1] "foo"

but if you add a matrix with x <- c(x, matrix(5,2,2), your list will have another 4 elements of value 5 ! You would better do:

x <- c(x, list(matrix(5,2,2))

It works for any other object and you will obtain as expected:

[[1]]
[1]

[[2]]
[1] "foo"

[[3]]
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    5    5
[2,]    5    5

Finally, your function becomes:

push <- function(l, ...) c(l, list(...))

and it works for any type of object. You can be smarter and do:

push_back <- function(l, ...) c(l, list(...))
push_front <- function(l, ...) c(list(...), l)
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protected by joran Sep 9 '12 at 19:51

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