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I'm looking at the MDC page for the @font-face CSS rule, but I don't get one thing. I have separate files for bold, italic and bold + italic. How can I embed all three files in one @font-face rule? For example, if I have:

@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("./fonts/DejaVuSans.ttf") format("ttf");
}
strong {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    font-weight: bold;
}

The browser will not know what font to use for bold (because that file is DejaVuSansBold.ttf), so it will default to something I probably don't want. How can I tell the browser all the different variants I have for a certain font?

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As an extension to the question if we use these fonts in WYSIWYG editors like TinyMCE , do we still need the Bold Italics ? Despite the TinyMCE having buttongs to do Bold Italics ? My guess answer is a YES - because interally they look for these files ? –  Nishant Nov 19 '13 at 14:40
    
possible duplicate of How to merge fonts? –  user2284570 Oct 26 '14 at 20:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 397 down vote accepted

The solution seems to be to add multiple @font-face rules, for example:

@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans.ttf");
}
@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans-Bold.ttf");
    font-weight: bold;
}
@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans-Oblique.ttf");
    font-style: italic, oblique;
}
@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans-BoldOblique.ttf");
    font-weight: bold;
    font-style: italic, oblique;
}

By the way, it would seem Google Chrome doesn't know about the format("ttf") argument, so you might want to skip that.

(This answer was correct for the CSS 2 specification. CSS3 only allows for one font-style rather than a comma-separated list.)

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3  
I would've never thought of that... –  ZoogieZork Mar 13 '10 at 1:01
4  
format("ttf") ? –  N 1.1 Mar 13 '10 at 1:09
78  
The order is important, the bold/italic style must come last. –  The Who Jun 11 '10 at 12:40
7  
Worth noting that this doesn't work in IE8 (and below), even if you use an EOT. IE will download the alternate typeface, but it won't use it, instead it will fake-bold/italic the regular typeface. Also, Chrome 11 seems to fail render a typeface that's both bold and italic –  Jaffa The Cake May 5 '11 at 18:46
3  
I was having trouble with this snipped on the embedded browser Android 4.4. Ended changing font-style: italic, oblique; to just font-style: italic; seemed to fix everything. –  Xavi Jan 10 '14 at 22:36

I have found problems using font-style: italic, oblique; with Firefox 3.6/Windows. It turns out it's actually invalid CSS and only one style can be specified at a time. So you'll need two extra @font-faces, one for italic and one for oblique.

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10  
This is a comment on the accepted answer, not an answer on its own. –  Chris Morgan Jul 7 '13 at 12:34
    
It is valid CSS, though I haven't checked what the support is like: w3.org/TR/2008/REC-CSS2-20080411/fonts.html, section 15.3.2 –  Chris Morgan Jul 7 '13 at 12:38
    
I'm also experiencing this problem on recent version of Firefox (32) and Chrome (35). 2 @font-face defs works fine. Anyone else? –  Nicolas Wormser Oct 13 '14 at 14:37
    
In fact, font-style now takes only one value, per the CSS3 spec (changed from CSS2). –  Josiah Feb 17 at 22:35

As of CSS3, the spec has changed, allowing for only a single font-style. A comma-separated list (per CSS2) will be treated as if it were normal and override any earlier (default) entry. This will make fonts defined in this way appear italic permanently.

@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans.ttf");
}
@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans-Bold.ttf");
    font-weight: bold;
}
@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans-Oblique.ttf");
    font-style: italic;
}
@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans-BoldOblique.ttf");
    font-weight: bold;
    font-style: italic;
}
@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans-Oblique.ttf");
    font-style: oblique;
}
@font-face {
    font-family: "DejaVu Sans";
    src: url("fonts/DejaVuSans-BoldOblique.ttf");
    font-weight: bold;
    font-style: oblique;
}

In most cases, italic will probably be sufficient and oblique rules won't be necessary if you take care to define whichever you will use and stick to it.

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I believe the third and fourth fonts are named wrong, they should have "Italic" instead of "Oblique". –  Nathan Merrill Aug 1 at 3:33
    
@NathanMerrill as by OP: I have separate files for bold, italic and bold + italic - so there's three different files. This answer corrects the accepted one in that font-style: italic, oblique; is no longer valid, but also that answer used the same file for italic and oblique. Still, worth pointing out that the file is shared in two cases. –  Silly Freak Aug 1 at 11:05
    
@NathanMerrill - If you used both oblique and italic styles but only had 3 files, as in the OP's question, you'd need this style. If you have 5 files, plug them in as you want. If you have don't use both oblique and italic (why would you if you had only 3 files?), then just use one set of rules. –  Josiah Aug 3 at 21:17

If you are using Google fonts I would suggest the following.

If you want the fonts to run from your localhost or server you need to download the files.

Instead of downloading the ttf packages in the download links, use the live link they provide, for example:

http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Source+Sans+Pro:300,400,600,300italic,400italic,600italic

Paste the URL in your browser and you should get a font-face declaration similar to the first answer.

Open the URLs provided, download and rename the files.

Stick the updated font-face declarations with relative paths to the woff files in your CSS, and you are done.

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