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Here's my code:

    select yr,count(*)  from movie
join casting on casting.movieid=movie.id
join actor on casting.actorid = actor.id
where actor.name = 'John Travolta'
group by yr

Here's the question

Which were the busiest years for 'John Travolta'. Show the number of movies he made for each year.

Here's the table structure:

movie(id, title, yr, score, votes, director)
actor(id, name)
casting(movieid, actorid, ord)

This is the output I am getting:

yr  count(*)
1976    1
1977    1
1978    1
1981    1
1994    1
etcetc

I need to get the rows for which count(*) is max.

How do I do this?

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9 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Use:

  SELECT m.yr, 
         COUNT(*) AS num_movies
    FROM MOVIE m
    JOIN CASTING c ON c.movieid = m.id
    JOIN ACTOR a ON a.id = c.actorid
                AND a.name = 'John Travolta'
GROUP BY m.yr
ORDER BY num_movies DESC, m.yr DESC

Ordering by num_movies DESC will put the highest values at the top of the resultset. If numerous years have the same count, the m.yr will place the most recent year at the top... until the next num_movies value changes.

Can I use a MAX(COUNT(*)) ?


No, you can not layer aggregate functions on top of one another in the same SELECT clause. The inner aggregate would have to be performed in a subquery. IE:

SELECT MAX(y.num)
  FROM (SELECT COUNT(*) AS num
          FROM TABLE x) y
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Just order by count(*) desc and you'll get the highest (if you combine it with limit 1)

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SELECT * from 
(
SELECT yr as YEAR, COUNT(title) as TCOUNT
FROM actor
JOIN casting ON actor.id = casting.actorid
JOIN movie ON casting.movieid = movie.id
WHERE name = 'John Travolta'
GROUP BY yr
order by TCOUNT desc
) res
where rownum < 2
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Depending on which database you're using...

select yr, count(*) num from ...
order by num desc

Most of my experience is in Sybase, which uses some different syntax than other DBs. But in this case, you're naming your count column, so you can sort it, descending order. You can go a step further, and restrict your results to the first 10 rows (to find his 10 busiest years).

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it's from this site - http://sqlzoo.net/3.htm 2 possible solutions:

with TOP 1 a ORDER BY ... DESC:

SELECT yr, COUNT(title) 
FROM actor 
JOIN casting ON actor.id=actorid
JOIN movie ON movie.id=movieid
WHERE name = 'John Travolta'
GROUP BY yr
HAVING count(title)=(SELECT TOP 1 COUNT(title) 
FROM casting 
JOIN movie ON movieid=movie.id 
JOIN actor ON actor.id=actorid
WHERE name='John Travolta'
GROUP BY yr
ORDER BY count(title) desc)

with MAX:

SELECT yr, COUNT(title) 
FROM actor  
JOIN casting ON actor.id=actorid    
JOIN movie ON movie.id=movieid
WHERE name = 'John Travolta'
GROUP BY yr
HAVING 
    count(title)=
        (SELECT MAX(A.CNT) 
            FROM (SELECT COUNT(title) AS CNT FROM actor 
                JOIN casting ON actor.id=actorid
                JOIN movie ON movie.id=movieid
                    WHERE name = 'John Travolta'
                    GROUP BY (yr)) AS A)
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     select top 1 yr,count(*)  from movie
join casting on casting.movieid=movie.id
join actor on casting.actorid = actor.id
where actor.name = 'John Travolta'
group by yr order by 2 desc
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Using max with a limit will only give you the first row, but if there are two or more rows with the same number of maximum movies, then you are going to miss some data. Below is a way to do it if you have the rank() function available.

SELECT
    total_final.yr,
    total_final.num_movies
    FROM
    ( SELECT 
        total.yr, 
        total.num_movies, 
        RANK() OVER (ORDER BY num_movies desc) rnk
        FROM (
               SELECT 
                      m.yr, 
                      COUNT(*) AS num_movies
               FROM MOVIE m
               JOIN CASTING c ON c.movieid = m.id
               JOIN ACTOR a ON a.id = c.actorid
               WHERE a.name = 'John Travolta'
               GROUP BY m.yr
             ) AS total
    ) AS total_final 
   WHERE rnk = 1
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The following code gives you the answer. It essentially implements MAX(COUNT(*)) by using ALL. It has the advantage that it uses very basic commands and operations.

SELECT yr, COUNT(title)
FROM actor
JOIN casting ON actor.id = casting.actorid
JOIN movie ON casting.movieid = movie.id
WHERE name = 'John Travolta'
GROUP BY yr HAVING COUNT(title) >= ALL
  (SELECT COUNT(title)
   FROM actor
   JOIN casting ON actor.id = casting.actorid
   JOIN movie ON casting.movieid = movie.id
   WHERE name = 'John Travolta'
   GROUP BY yr)
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Thanks to the last answer

SELECT yr, COUNT(title)
FROM actor
JOIN casting ON actor.id = casting.actorid
JOIN movie ON casting.movieid = movie.id
WHERE name = 'John Travolta'
GROUP BY yr HAVING COUNT(title) >= ALL
  (SELECT COUNT(title)
   FROM actor
   JOIN casting ON actor.id = casting.actorid
   JOIN movie ON casting.movieid = movie.id
   WHERE name = 'John Travolta'
   GROUP BY yr)

I had the same problem, I needed to know just the records which their count match the maximus count. (it could be one or several records)

I have to learn more about "ALL clause", and this is exactly the kind of simple solution that I was looking for.

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