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I have a nested list, and I am trying to non-destructively replace all its elements (inside the nested list as well). That is, given my input list

'(1 '(2 3 4) '(5 6 7) 8 9)

I am trying to achieve

'(0 '(0 0 0) '(0 0 0) 0 0)

I tried the following

 (defun subs-list (list value)
  "Replaces all elements of a list of list with given value"
  (loop for elt in list
       collect (if (listp elt)
           (subs-list elt value) 
           value)))

But when I try

(subs-list '(1 '(2 3 4) '(5 6 7) 8 9) 0)
(0 (0 (0 0 0)) (0 (0 0 0)) 0 0)

is the output I get. What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Are you really sure '(1 '(2 3 4) '(5 6 7) 8 9) is a useful list? I have never seen such a list in practical applications in Lisp. Nested quoted lists usually don't make any sense and are an indicator for a wrong understanding of quoting in Lisp. –  Rainer Joswig Jun 24 '14 at 16:04
1  
@RainerJoswig, you're right, I initially was made to believe that ' was short for (list). My actual input is (list 1 (list 2 3 4) (list 5 6 7) 8 9) –  Ash Jun 25 '14 at 22:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Mark's answer and wdebeaum's answer explain why you're getting the results that you're getting; the nested quotes mean you've actually got a list like (1 (quote (2 3 4)) (quote (5 6 7)) 8 9), and you're replacing the symbol quote with 0, and that's why you get (0 (0 (0 0 0)) (0 (0 0 0)) 0 0). You probably want just '(1 (2 3 4) (5 6 7) 8 9) with no nested quotes.

It's worth pointing out that Common Lisp already provides a functions for non-destructively substituting in cons-trees, though: subst, subst-if, and subst-if-not. There are destructive versions, too: nsubst, nsubst-if, and nsubst-if-not. In particular, for this case you can just replace everything that's not a list with 0, either by using the complement function with listp and subst-if, or using listp and subst-if-not:

;; With `extra' elements because of the quotes:

(subst-if-not 0 #'listp '(1 '(2 3 4) '(5 6 7) 8 9))
;=> (0 (0 (0 0 0)) (0 (0 0 0)) 0 0) 

(subst-if 0 (complement #'listp) '(1 '(2 3 4) '(5 6 7) 8 9))
;=> (0 (0 (0 0 0)) (0 (0 0 0)) 0 0) 
;; With no `extra' elements:

(subst-if-not 0 #'listp '(1 (2 3 4) (5 6 7) 8 9))
;=> (0 (0 0 0) (0 0 0) 0 0)

(subst-if 0 (complement #'listp) '(1 (2 3 4) (5 6 7) 8 9))
;=> (0 (0 0 0) (0 0 0) 0 0)

If you wanted to take the hybrid approach suggested in wdebeaum's answer where you don't replace quotes, you can do that do:

(subst-if 0 (lambda (x)
              (not (or (listp x)
                       (eq 'quote x))))
          '(1 '(2 3 4) '(5 6 7) 8 9))
;=> (0 '(0 0 0) '(0 0 0) 0 0)

(subst-if-not 0 (lambda (x)
                  (or (listp x)
                      (eq 'quote x)))
          '(1 '(2 3 4) '(5 6 7) 8 9))
;=> (0 '(0 0 0) '(0 0 0) 0 0)
share|improve this answer
    
I knew there was a simpler way, I looked at `(subst-if) earlier, but didn't know how to have "all/every" element as the test condition. –  Ash Jun 24 '14 at 1:03
    
@Ash well, subst operates on the tree, so it's recursing into the car and cdr of each cons cell. The trick is that listp doesn't actually check for a proper list but just "cons cell or nil". Those are the only things in your case that you don't want to replace. –  Joshua Taylor Jun 24 '14 at 1:09

What am I doing wrong?

You have actually done a good work with loop and it works! Remember that ' stands for quote, so:

'(1 '(2 3 4) '(5 6 7) 8 9)

is equal to

(quote (1 (quote (2 3 4)) (quote (5 6 7)) 8 9))
;       |  |      | | |    |      | | |   | |
       (0 (0     (0 0 0)) (0     (0 0 0)) 0 0)

you see, your quotes have been substituted too (except for the first one, which has been consumed during evaluation of the function argument)! One quote is enough to suspend execution.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah! That makes sense! Thanks! –  Ash Jun 23 '14 at 16:59
1  
The use of loop here is actually overkill, though. Using the standard subst-if, this is just (subst-if '0 (complement #'listp) '(1 (2 3 4) (5 6 7) 8 9)) => (0 (0 0 0) (0 0 0) 0 0). –  Joshua Taylor Jun 23 '14 at 22:27

You have to realize that 'foo is syntactic sugar for (quote foo), so when you use quotes inside an already-quoted list, this:

'(1 '(2 3 4) '(5 6 7) 8 9)

evaluates to this:

(1 (quote (2 3 4)) (quote (5 6 7)) 8 9)

So when you substitute all the list elements with 0, you get:

(0 (0     (0 0 0)) (0     (0 0 0)) 0 0)

You either need to not put extra quotes in your examples, or you need to handle the quote operator specially in subs-list:

(defun subs-list (list value)
  "Replaces all elements of a list of list with given value"

  (loop for elt in list
       collect
         (cond 
           ((listp elt) 
             (subs-list elt value))
           ((eq 'quote elt)
             elt)
           (t
             value))))
share|improve this answer
    
This can be handled more concisely with subst-if, even with the special handling of the quotes. –  Joshua Taylor Jun 23 '14 at 22:36

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