Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for a way to export a Git repository so that I get a zip or directory for each branch individually.

This is similar to How to do a "git export" (like "svn export")?, but instead of a zip of the current branch I am hoping to get a zip for every branch.

Is there a Git or Bash command that could do this?

share|improve this question
    
As pointed out in toydarian's answer, git archive can accept a branch name to export as an argument, so you just need to write a script that loops through the branch names and passes them to git archive, like toydarian has done. –  Cupcake Jun 23 at 19:03
    
I was asking for a command because I was hoping an OS agnostic method existed. Scripts like toydarians are useful, but wont run on windows. Yes, I could write a windows-compatible one, but I wanted to find out if a normal command could do it; it looks like the answer is no. –  Tyrsius Jun 23 at 19:22
    
You say it won't run on Windows, and yet you asked specifically for a Bash command. Are you using Git Bash? It should work as long as you use Git Bash, even on Windows. –  Cupcake Jun 23 at 19:25
    
I am using Git bash. It does not work. $ for f in ${$(git branch)[@]:1}; do; git archive --format zip --output /out/${f}.zip $f; done sh.exe": syntax error near unexpected token ;'` –  Tyrsius Jun 23 at 22:13
    
There's probably a syntax mistake somewhere in the first line (Bash for loops will work in Windows Git Bash), I'm working on an alternative... –  Cupcake Jun 23 at 22:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use git archive with a branch argument

git archive can accept a branch name to export as an argument, so you just need to write a script that loops through the branch names and passes them to git archive. For example, this will work in Windows Git Bash:

git for-each-ref --format='%(refname:short)' refs/heads | \
while read branch; do
  git archive --format zip --output <outputDirectory>/${branch}.zip $branch
done

I modified it from the 2nd example in the official Linux Kernel documentation for git for-each-ref.

Breakdown

$ git for-each-ref --format='%(refname:short)' refs/heads
foo
master

git for-each-ref will list each local branch under refs/heads, using just the branch name with the refname:short format.

That output is piped into a Bash while loop, which then substitutes the branch name for the git archive arguments:

while read branch; do
  git archive --format zip --output <outputDirectory>/${branch}.zip $branch
done

For-loop solution

Here's a Bash for loop solution, inspired by toydarian's (non-working) solution:

for branch in $(git for-each-ref --format='%(refname:short)' refs/heads); do
  git archive --format zip --output <outputDirectory>/${branch}.zip $branch
done

Documentation

share|improve this answer

Try this script. Make sure you checked out master before using the script!

for f in ${$(git branch)[@]:1}; do
    git archive --format zip --output /path/to/dir/${f}.zip $f
done

Here's the same commands in one line, to make it easier to copy, paste, and execute:

for f in ${$(git branch)[@]:1}; do; git archive --format zip --output /path/to/dir/${f}.zip $f; done
share|improve this answer
    
FYI, your commands won't work in Windows Git Bash, you probably have a syntax error somewhere: "sh.exe": syntax error near unexpected token ``;'". That's the error the for the one-liner. "sh.exe": ${$(git branch)[@]:1}: bad substitution". That's the error for the first one. –  Cupcake Jun 23 at 22:49
    
Also note that you can actually copy, paste, and execute the first version of your command just fine, it shouldn't be necessary to put everything on one line in a terminal. –  Cupcake Jun 23 at 23:04
    
FYI, git branch is ill-suited to listing branches, unless you strip out the * that's listed next to the current branch, because * is interpreted as a file glob by $(), so it ends up expanding to all the files and directories in the current directory. It's one of Git's "porcelain" commands, vs a "plumbing" command like git for-each-ref, which is specifically made for scripting purposes, unlike git branch. –  Cupcake Jun 24 at 2:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.