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I have a function that constructs a lambda function with a move-capture (C++1y only) and returns it.

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <memory>

using namespace std;

function<int ()> makeLambda(unique_ptr<int> ptr) {
    return [ ptr( move(ptr) ) ] () {
        return *ptr;
    };
}

int main() {
    // Works
    {
        unique_ptr<int> ptr( new int(10) );
        auto function1 = [ ptr(move(ptr)) ] {
            return *ptr;
        };
    }

    // Does not work
    {
        unique_ptr<int> ptr( new int(10) );
        auto function2 = makeLambda( std::move(ptr) );
    }

    return 0;
}

However, it seems as though upon returning, unique_ptr<int>'s copy constructor is called. Why is this/how can I get around this?

Link to paste: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/b21c358db10c3933

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marked as duplicate by Kerrek SB Jun 23 '14 at 22:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
What happens if you change auto function1 = ... to function<int()> function1 = .... I think the problem is with using std::function, not with using return types. –  nosid Jun 23 '14 at 22:09
    
Doesn't seem to make a difference: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/00a26f08aef8944c –  par Jun 23 '14 at 22:10
1  
Well, it makes a difference. If I make the change, the first part no longer works. –  nosid Jun 23 '14 at 22:13
    
Oh, sorry. I misunderstood your comment. –  par Jun 23 '14 at 22:15
1  
By the way, your code is very noisy. In modern C++, I would probably prefer to write it like this. –  Kerrek SB Jun 23 '14 at 22:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is the std::function<int ()> return type, which is attempting to make a copy of the lambda. This will fail because the copy constructor is implicitly deleted due to the presence of the std::unique_ptr. Instead of storing the lambda in a std::function object, use return type deduction, now the lambda will be moved.

auto makeLambda(unique_ptr<int> ptr) {
    return [ ptr( move(ptr) ) ] () {
        return *ptr;
    };
}

Live demo

You should also probably change the argument type of makeLambda to unique_ptr<int>&&

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. As for the &&, there is a pretty good argument for passing unique_ptr by value here: stackoverflow.com/questions/8114276/… –  par Jun 23 '14 at 22:21
    
@par Thanks for that link, I'd not seen that before. Nicol does make a good argument for passing by value. However, in case of a move-only type, which is being passed to a function that unconditionally moves the object, I think I still prefer the rvalue reference argument. IMHO, the error message is a little clearer if someone attempts to pass an lvalue to the function. –  Praetorian Jun 23 '14 at 22:29

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