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This is an assignment for a class.

Here is my code so far.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Proj03
{
    class MyClass
    {
        public string MyClass(bool First, int Last)
        {

            if (First == true)
            {
                return "FirstName";
            }

            else if (Last == 3)
            {
                return "LastName";
            }

        }


    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            bool var1 = true;
            int var2 = 3;
            Console.WriteLine(new MyClass(var1)); //Line 34
            Console.WriteLine(new MyClass(var2)); //Line 35
            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to terminate.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }//end main
    }//end class Program
}//end namespace

The problem I'm having is twofold:

First, the error on line 34 and 35 keeps saying that there is no constructor in "MyClass" that takes one argument. So it's easy to deduce that, wow, I need a constructor that can take one argument in the class. I can make the constructor just fine, but the difficulty is in passing the "var1" and "var2". I believe I need to pass by reference here.

Secondly, I believe I need to take into consideration the fact that "var1" and "var2" are different variable types. This I really don't know what to do about. But the main question of this post is figuring out the first problem.

The limitation put on us by the instructor is that we are not allowed to change anything within the "Program" class.

The required output is as follows:

Display your first name here Display your last name here Press any key to terminate.

share|improve this question
1  
public string MyClass(bool First, int Last): Constructor doesn't return a value, so this isn't a constructor... And even as a method, what happens if First = false and Last = 42? –  John3136 Jun 23 '14 at 22:31
    
You can make two constructors, one that takes a bool, and one that takes an int. –  Blorgbeard Jun 23 '14 at 22:33
    
And, if the Program class has been written by your instructor then I will be worried for you –  Steve Jun 23 '14 at 22:33
    
You will also have to implement ToString for anything meaningful to be printed to the console. –  Blorgbeard Jun 23 '14 at 22:34
    
Did your instructor specify example console output? –  Cᴏʀʏ Jun 23 '14 at 22:35

5 Answers 5

You can address the missing constructor issue like this:

    public MyClass(bool First)
    {
        // your code here
    }

    public MyClass(int Last)
    {
        // your code here
    }

Note that there is no return type specified, as constructors don't have returns. This will allow your constructor calls to run successfully.

share|improve this answer

I probably shouldn't be doing that, but, well... is this what you're trying to achieve?

class MyClass
{
    private bool? _first;
    private int? _last;

    public MyClass(bool first)
    {
        _first = first;
    }

    public MyClass(int last)
    {
        _last = last;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        if (_first != null)
            return "FirstName";

        if (_last != null)
            return "LastName";

        return String.Empty;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So when "var1" is passed to MyClass, the fact that underscore last is an int? means that it's set to null? (and therefore only results in the return of "FirstName") –  Newprgm Jun 23 '14 at 22:57
    
Exactly. An int? will be initialized to null. int? is syntactic sugar for Nullable<int>, which is a struct with an int Value property and an bool HasValue property. _first != null gets translated to _first.HasValue by the compiler. But I just realized I may have shown you things you didn't learn yet... –  Lucas Trzesniewski Jun 23 '14 at 23:01
    
The problem regarding things I haven't learned yet is that the class I'm currently taking is the first C# course for me, that it's a 9 week course, and it's online (bad scheduling on my part). This isn't a course I'm taking for my degree though, but an on the side course which I thought would deal more with XNA 4.0, rather than microsoft visual C# (though I enjoy C# as well (so far)). –  Newprgm Jun 23 '14 at 23:12

The problem is arising from the fact that you have your class name and method named the same. You cannot do this. Any properties or methods in your class must not be called the same as your class.

Your constructor issue is due to you calling new MyClass(var1). You did not specify a constructor in your class. That would look something like this:

public class MyClass
{
    // This is a constructor that takes a parameter.
    public MyClass(string myString)
    {
    }

    // This is a constructor that takes 0 parameters.
    // This exists if you do not specifically declare a constructor.
    public MyClass()
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer

What you are looking for here is called constructor overloading. You should make one constructor that accepts a bool as an argument and another that accepts an int.

It is a homework assignment, so I am not going to provide a sample. However, that should be enough to get you started.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer

Have a look at optional arguments. Using them, you could assign the arguments in the constructor default values (different from what will be sent by the program). Then, your program can send over either variable type and no error will be thrown regarding incorrect number of arguments or variable types.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't believe it's possible to solve this with optional arguments. In this case, the first arguments are different types in the two calls. Optional arguments can only appear at the end of the parameter list. –  recursive Jun 23 '14 at 22:35
    
I seem to remember being able to include only optional arguments - still satisfying the "Optional arguments can only appear at the end of the parameter list". I'm wondering whether it would figure out which variable to modify by the type of variable it received... Been a while away from C# :) –  Byron Coetsee Jun 23 '14 at 22:45

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