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I am trying to learn pointers by writing simple code snippets. I wrote the following today,

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void funcall1(int *arr_p, int *num_elements_p)
{
  int i = 0;
  *num_elements_p = 10;
  int *temp = (int *)malloc(10 * sizeof(int));
  if (temp != NULL)
  {
    arr_p = (int *)temp;
  }
  else
  {
      free(arr_p);
      printf("Error\n");
      return;
  }
  printf("\n------------------------funcall1------------------------------\n");
  for (i=0; i<(*num_elements_p); i++)
  {
      arr_p[i]= i;
      printf ("%d\t", arr_p[i]);
  }

}
int main()
{
  int *arr = NULL;
  int num_elements = 0;
  int i = 0;
  /*int *temp = (int *)malloc(10 * sizeof(int));
  if (temp != NULL)
  {
      arr = (int *)temp;
  }
  else
  {
      free(arr);
      printf("Error\n");
      return;
  }*/

  funcall1(arr, &num_elements);
  printf("\n------------------------Main------------------------------\n");
  for (i=0; i<num_elements; i++)
  {
    printf ("%d\t", arr[i]);
  }
  printf ("\n");
  free(arr);
  return 0;
}

When I use malloc in the main function the code works as expected; but when I use it in the called function it doesn't, I get segmentation fault. I have researched a bit and understood few basics like, 1. Array name is actually a pointer to the first element in the array. So, I am passing the parameters correctly. 2. The array gets updated, because I am printing the array in the called function as well.

Since arr_p is in fact pointing to where arr points to, when I do "arr_p = (int *)temp" doesn't it mean, arr also points to this allocated memory space? I am looking for what happens in the memory and why do I get a memory access violation here? I don't want to convince myself with some partially derived assumptions.

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6  
C is pass-by-value. –  chris Jun 23 at 23:53
1  
Just to clarify further, arr_p is not the same as arr; when you assign a new value to arr_p, arr is still pointing to whatever it was pointing before. –  vanza Jun 23 at 23:55
    
Since arr_p is in fact pointing to where arr points to... Think of it this way. You take int i. You pass 5. Since they have the same value, should doing i = 6; change the original? –  chris Jun 23 at 23:56
1  
@SaranyaDeviGanesan, The pointer gets passed by value. It stores the same address. You use that address to access the int indirectly. –  chris Jun 24 at 0:20
1  
"Since arr_p is in fact pointing to where arr points to, when I do "arr_p = (int *)temp" ... you just threw out the very address that made the first part of this sentence true. –  WhozCraig Jun 24 at 3:03

1 Answer 1

Within main, your code more or less makes sense.

Within funcall1, arr_p is a copy of the value passed to it, and if NULL, you are attempting to free memory that has not necessarily been allocated.

The function should be more like:

void funcall1(int *arr_p, int *num_elements_p)
{
  /* ALWAYS do a sanity check at the beginning of your functions */
  if (!arr_p || !num_elements_p) {
    printf("Invalid input\n");
    return;
  }
  int i = 0;
  *num_elements_p = 10;
  int *temp = (int *)malloc(10 * sizeof(int));
  if (temp == NULL) {
    printf("Memory allocation error!\n");
    return;
  }
  printf("\n------------------------funcall1------------------------------\n");
  for (i=0; i<(*num_elements_p); i++) {
      arr_p[i]= i;
      printf ("%d\t", arr_p[i]);
  }

}

This appears what you intended to do. Also, please refer to the references below.

References


  1. *Function pass by value vs. pass by reference *, Accessed 2014-06-23, <http://courses.washington.edu/css342/zander/css332/passby.html>
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't really make sense to have the function able to change *num_elements_p, but expect also memory to be preallocated for its old value. –  Matt McNabb Jun 24 at 0:39
2  
your function assigns to temp but never uses temp. The solution also does not address the OP's crash which happens because he uses and frees arr which was never assigned to. –  Peter Schneider Jun 24 at 0:40

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