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I've got a function, in my minimum example called maybeProduceValue i j, which is only valid when i > j. Note that in my actual code, the js are not uniform and so the data only resembles a triangular matrix, I don't know what the mathematical name for this is.

I'd like my code, which loops over i and j and returns essentially (where js is sorted)

[maximum [f i j | j <- js, j < i] | i <- [0..iMax]]

to not check any more j's once one has failed. In C-like languages, this is simple as

if (j >= i) {break;}

and I'm trying to recreate this behaviour in Haskell. I've got two implementations below:

  • one which tries to take advantage of laziness by using takeWhile to only inspect at most one value (per i) which fails the test and returns Nothing;

  • one which remembers the number of js which worked for the previous i and so, for i+1, it doesn't bother doing any safety checks until it exceeds this number.

This latter function is more than twice as fast by my benchmarks but it really is a mess - I'm trying to convince people that Haskell is more concise and safe while still reasonably performant and here is some fast code which is dense, cluttered and does a bunch of unsafe operations.

Is there a solution, perhaps using Cont, Error or Exception, that can achieve my desired behaviour?

n.b. I've tried using Traversable.mapAccumL and Vector.unfoldrN instead of State and they end up being about the same speed and clarity. It's still a very overcomplicated way of solving this problem.

import Criterion.Config
import Criterion.Main
import Control.DeepSeq
import Control.Monad.State
import Data.Maybe
import qualified Data.Traversable as T
import qualified Data.Vector as V

main = deepseq inputs $ defaultMainWith (defaultConfig{cfgSamples = ljust 10}) (return ()) [
    bcompare [
        bench "whileJust" $ nf whileJust js,
        bench "memoised"  $ nf memoisedSection js
    ]]

iMax = 5000
jMax = 10000

-- any sorted vector
js :: V.Vector Int
js = V.enumFromN 0 jMax

maybeProduceValue :: Int -> Int -> Maybe Float
maybeProduceValue i j | j < i = Just (fromIntegral (i+j))
                      | otherwise = Nothing

unsafeProduceValue :: Int -> Int -> Float
-- unsafeProduceValue i j | j >= i = error "you fool!"
unsafeProduceValue i j = fromIntegral (i+j)

whileJust, memoisedSection
    :: V.Vector Int -> V.Vector Float

-- mean: 389ms
-- short circuits properly
whileJust inputs' = V.generate iMax $ \i ->
    safeMax . V.map fromJust . V.takeWhile isJust $ V.map (maybeProduceValue i) inputs'
    where safeMax v = if V.null v then 0 else V.maximum v

-- mean: 116ms
-- remembers the (monotonically increasing) length of the section of
-- the vector that is safe. I have tested that this doesn't violate the condition that j < i
memoisedSection inputs' = flip evalState 0 $ V.generateM iMax $ \i -> do
    validSection <- state $ \oldIx ->
            let newIx = oldIx + V.length (V.takeWhile (< i) (V.unsafeDrop oldIx inputs'))
            in (V.unsafeTake newIx inputs', newIx)
    return $ V.foldl' max 0 $ V.map (unsafeProduceValue i) validSection
share|improve this question
    
I really don't understand your description. Note that using a global variable for the input, and applying deepSeq to it, may screw up compiler optimizations something awful. –  dfeuer Jun 24 '14 at 0:30
    
I don't understand why you're bringing Maybe into it. Isn't j <- takeWhile (< i) js about what you're looking for? –  dfeuer Jun 24 '14 at 0:34
1  
Please do not engage forum-like discussions between answers and the body of your question. An answer should be considered and accepted only if it's a definite answer to the problem, not if it's only a "suggestion". And please, do not radically change your code after you have received 3 answers. You are invalidating all of them at once. –  ʎǝɹɟɟɟǝſ Jun 24 '14 at 0:54

4 Answers 4

Here's a simple way of solving the problem with Applicatives, provided that you don't need to keep the rest of the list once you run into an issue:

import Control.Applicative

memoizeSections :: Ord t => [(t, t)] -> Maybe [t]
memoizeSections []          = Just []
memoizeSections ((x, y):xs) = (:) <$> maybeProduceValue x y <*> memoizeSections xs 

This is equivalent to:

import Data.Traversable

memoizeSections :: Ord t => [(t, t)] -> Maybe [t]    
memoizeSections = flip traverse (uncurry maybeProduceValue)

and will return Nothing on the first occurrence of failure. Note that I don't know how fast this is, but it's certainly concise, and arguably pretty clear (particularly the first example).

share|improve this answer

Some minor comments:

-- any sorted vector
js :: V.Vector Int
js = V.enumFromN 0 jMax

If you have a vector of Ints (or Floats, etc), you want to use Data.Vector.Unboxed.

maybeProduceValue :: Int -> Int -> Maybe Float
maybeProduceValue i j | j < i = Just (fromIntegral (i+j))
                      | otherwise = Nothing

Since Just is lazy in its only field, this will create a thunk for the computation fromIntegral (i+j). You almost always want to apply Just like so

maybeProduceValue i j | j < i = Just $! fromIntegral (i+j)

There are some more thunks in:

memoisedSection inputs' = flip evalState 0 $ V.generateM iMax $ \i -> do
    validSection <- state $ \oldIx ->
            let newIx = oldIx + V.length (V.takeWhile (< i) (V.unsafeDrop oldIx inputs'))
            in (V.unsafeTake newIx inputs', newIx)
    return $ V.foldl' max 0 $ V.map (unsafeProduceValue i) validSection

Namely you want to:

            let !newIx = oldIx + V.length (V.takeWhile (< i) (V.unsafeDrop oldIx inputs'))
                !v = V.unsafeTake newIx inputs'
            in (v, newIx)

as the pair is lazy in its fields and

    return $! V.foldl' max 0 $ V.map (unsafeProduceValue i) validSection

because return in the state monad is lazy in the value.

share|improve this answer

You can use a guard in a single list comprehension:

[f i j | j <- js, i <- is, j < i]
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't seem to get at the problem; the OP wants to optimize based on the fact something or other is sorted. –  dfeuer Jun 24 '14 at 0:32

If you're trying to get the same results as

[foo i j | i <- is, j <- js, j < i]

when you know that js is increasing, just write

[foo i j | i <- is, j <- takeWhile (< i) js]

There's no need to mess around with Maybe for this. Note that making the input list global has a likely-unfortunate effect: instead of fusing the production of the input list with its transformation(s) and ultimate consumption, it's forced to actually construct the list and then keep it in memory. It's quite possible that it will take longer to pull the list into cache from memory than to generate it piece by piece on the fly!

share|improve this answer
    
I've edited the question to reflect your suggest thanks. The difference in performance between the two implementations still bothers me but I suppose the first one is more true to the break; code anyway. –  user1058064 Jun 24 '14 at 0:51

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