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I was playing around with HTML and CSS to see if I could do a LaTeX logo that would scale and color with the rest of the text (not an image). I can do it with an inline-block <div> if it's not enclosed in a paragraph. If I add <p> and </p> tags, it breaks. What's the difference between a paragraph with explicit paragraph tags and one without? Would this be something fixed by certain HTML doctypes?

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<title>Test logos</title>
</head>
<body style="font: 12px Arial,sans-serif;">
1. div inline-block, works fine<br>
So as a helpful reminder, I thought I would gather some helpful information here to
help both veterans of these forums and new users lean how best to use these forums.
Where are the forum rules?
<div style="display: inline-block; position: relative;
 border: 1px solid blue; /* just for debug */
     font-family: Times-New-Roman,serif; height: 2ex; width: 2.30em;">
  <div style="left: 0em; bottom: -0.6ex; position: absolute;">L</div>
  <div style="left: 0.7em; bottom: 0.3ex; position: absolute; font-size: 50%;     
        font-weight: bold;">A</div>
  <div style="left: 0.6em; bottom: -0.6ex; position: absolute;">&Tau;</div>
  <div style="left: 1.35em; bottom: -1.25ex; position: absolute; font-size: 80%; 
        font-weight: 600;">&Epsilon;</div>
  <div style="left: 1.63em; bottom: -0.6ex; position: absolute; ">&Chi;</div>
</div>
rules!
You can find the forum rules via this thread:
Helping Each Other and Keeping Posts Respectful.
<hr>
<p>
2. p div inline-block, div OK, but /p inserted before it, so line break and gap 
        before div<br>
So as a helpful reminder, ...
<div style="display: inline-block; position: relative;
 border: 1px solid blue; 
font-family: Times-New-Roman,serif; height: 2ex; width: 2.30em;">
    << see nested <div>s above >>
</div>
rules!...
</p>
<hr>
3. span inline-block, works fine<br>
So as a helpful reminder, ...
<span style="display: inline-block; position: relative;
border: 1px solid blue; 
    font-family: Times-New-Roman,serif; height: 2ex; width: 2.30em;">
    << see nested <div>s above >>
</span>
rules! ...
<hr>
<p>
4. p span inline-block, block empty, /span and /p inserted after span<br>
So as a helpful reminder, ...
<span style="display: inline-block; position: relative;
 border: 1px solid blue; 
    font-family: Times-New-Roman,serif; height: 2ex; width: 2.30em;">
    << see nested <div>s above >>
</span>
rules! ...
</p>
<hr>
5. span block, block OK, but has line breaks before and after<br>
So as a helpful reminder, ...
<span style="display: block; position: relative;
 border: 1px solid blue; 
font-family: Times-New-Roman,serif; height: 2ex; width: 2.30em;">
    << see nested <div>s above >>
</span>
rules! ...
<hr>
<p>
    6. p span block, block empty, /span /p inserted, divs elsewhere, break 
    before/after block<br>
So as a helpful reminder, ...
<span style="display: block; position: relative;
 border: 1px solid blue; 
font-family: Times-New-Roman,serif; height: 2ex; width: 2.30em;">
    << see nested <div>s above >>
</span>
rules! ...
</p>
</body>
</html>

The first and third cases (no <p> tags) appear to work OK. The third has divs inside a span, but seems to accept it. The fourth and sixth cases (<span> block or inline-block, with <p>) get a </span> and </p> automatically inserted so the span content is a blank and the divs are floating off somewhere else. The second case is identical to the first, except with <p>, and a </p> gets automatically inserted (along with the margin) before the LaTeX logo block. The fifth case is like the third, except that it's a block rather than an inline-block (both span) and breaks are inserted before and after the logo block.

FF30 (my primary platform), Chrome, and IE11 all behave pretty much the same way. In a nutshell, why does adding paragraph tags make so much behavior change? It seems to be more than a simple block element with top and bottom margins!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Mainly, what you're running into is the fact that <div> tags are not allowed inside <p> tags. And there should only be inline elements inside of <span> tags. Different browsers may interpret this as you meant to put a </p> and insert various tags for you. Also, when it is display:block, it will take up the width of the containing element, in this case <body>, which is why there are what look like line breaks.

Take a look at the spec, Grouping Elements and Lines and Paragraphs. (The following are quotes from those sections.)

The P element represents a paragraph. It cannot contain block-level elements (including P itself).

and

 <!ELEMENT SPAN - - (%inline;)*    
share|improve this answer
    
So implicit paragraphs are not seen as paragraphs (limited block level elements that cannot be parents to blocks)? And what about divs within a span? That appears to have worked -- or did I just get lucky on that one? When a [normally] inline element such as a span is declared display=block or inline-block, does that change what is allowed for children, or do the default rules still apply? So, the $64 question is, is it possible to do what I'm trying to achieve, that is, position text within an otherwise inline stream? Can spans be made to accept positioning? –  Phil Perry Jun 24 '14 at 13:05
    
right, no implicit paragraphs. –  Mike Jun 24 '14 at 14:56
    
@phil-perry You'll probably see differences in various browsers with divs in a span. You can make it work, but the rules still apply, and different browsers(like, say, older IE) interpret the rules slightly differently sometimes. So the bottom line is, yes, you can. Just may need a little fiddling, but it's perfectly possible, like you saw with your 1st and 3rd test cases. –  Mike Jun 24 '14 at 15:06

types of paragraphs:

  1. physical vs conceptual
  2. explicit vs implicit
  3. deductive, inductive hybrid

summarizing abstract writing:

  1. descriptive abstract
  2. informative abstract
  3. combination descriptive and informational
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1  
This should either be a comment, or you should expand on each section. –  David Jan 17 at 8:44

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