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In the function below always the same user object is passed to the DoRestCall method

(I do have logging in the DoRestCall method and it has the same first data in the user object) Do I need to use Parallel.ForEach instead of Threadpool

private void CreateUser(DataServiceCollection<User> epUsers)
{
    foreach (User user in epUsers)
    {
        try
        {
            ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(f =>
            {
                DoRestCall(string.Format("MESSAGE-TYPE=UserEnrollmentCreate&PAYLOAD={0}",
                                         GenarateRequestUserData(user)), true);
            }));
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            _logger.Error("Error in CreateUser " + ex.Message);
        }
    }
}
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If you're making REST call, why use the ThreadPool for I/O bound work? Which version of the .NET framework are you using –  Yuval Itzchakov Jun 24 '14 at 6:58
    
Ys i'm making rest call any drawbacks ? C# and .net4.0 –  KRR Jun 24 '14 at 8:39
    
Yes. You allocate a ThreadPool threads just to block waiting for the REST call to return, it is a waste of resources. –  Yuval Itzchakov Jun 24 '14 at 8:40
    
Any alternative for it? –  KRR Jun 24 '14 at 8:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is how loop variables are handled when used in a lambda expression or anonymous methods. The lambda expression sees the current value of the loop variable at the time the lambda is executed. I believe this behaviour was changed in C# 5.0, but haven't tried it yet.

You need to store the current user in a variable inside the foreach loop and use that instead of the loop variable (also, your try / catch doesn't catch any exceptions inside your WaitCallback, see fix below):

foreach (User user in epUsers)
{
    User currentUser = user;
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(f =>
    {
        try
        {
            DoRestCall(string.Format("MESSAGE-TYPE=UserEnrollmentCreate&PAYLOAD={0}",
                                     GenarateRequestUserData(currentUser)), true);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            _logger.Error("Error in CreateUser " + ex.Message);
        }
    }));
}
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1  
foreach was changed in C# 5.0, for was not, so you're entirely right on all counts. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jun 24 '14 at 6:54

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