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I have a number of functions like this:

  // Convert a string to integer, defaulting to 0 if it fails
  def safeToInt(s: String): Int = try {
      s.toInt
    } catch {
      case _: NumberFormatException => 0
    }

  // Convert a string to long, defaulting to 0 if it fails
  def safeToLong(s: String): Long = try {
      s.toLong
    } catch {
      case _: NumberFormatException => 0
    }

  // Convert a string to double, defaulting to 0 if it fails
  def safeToDouble(s: String): Double = try {
      s.toDouble
    } catch {
      case _: NumberFormatException => 0
    }

Any way to make these cleaner? They essentially all do the same thing apart from one line.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use scala.util.Try

   import util.Try

   // Convert a string to integer, defaulting to 0 if it fails

   def safeToInt(s: String): Int = Try(s.toInt).getOrElse(0)

   // Convert a string to long, defaulting to 0 if it fails
   def safeToLong(s: String): Long = Try(s.toLong).getOrElse(0L)

   // Convert a string to double, defaulting to 0 if it fails
   def safeToDouble(s: String): Double = Try(s.toDouble).getOrElse(0.0)
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You can take advantage of Numeric to avoid duplicating the zero.

import scala.util.Try

def safeToNumeric[A: Numeric](f: String => A)(s: String): A =
  Try(f(s)).getOrElse(implicitly[Numeric[A]].zero)

val safeToInt = safeToNumeric(_.toInt)(_)
val safeToLong = safeToNumeric(_.toLong)(_)
val safeToDouble = safeToNumeric(_.toDouble)(_)

safeToInt("4") // 4
safeToDouble("a") // 0.0

Unfortunately Numeric doesn't give you the parsing method as well, but you can create the appropriate type class yourself ...

case class Parser[A](parse : String => A)

implicit val intParser = Parser(_.toInt)
implicit val longParser = Parser(_.toLong)
implicit val doubleParser = Parser(_.toDouble)

... and then you can write a single method that works for all of the types.

def safeTo[A: Parser : Numeric](s: String): A =
  Try(implicitly[Parser[A]].parse(s))
    .getOrElse(implicitly[Numeric[A]].zero)

safeTo[Int]("4") // 4
safeTo[Double]("a") // 0.0
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Although technically interesting, I wonder how the added complexity of this solution weights against the simple three lines proposed by @don-mackenzie. DRY bottom-line: improve code maintenability. –  maasg Jun 24 at 8:10
    
I guess I don't see it as all that interesting or complex. Why is it complex? Because it uses context bounds? Because the LoC is higher? Because the resulting method is more abstract? Is it not the most direct expression of the intent? –  Chris Martin Jun 24 at 8:46
    
[x] All of the above. –  maasg Jun 24 at 8:56

Although Chris Martin's answer is probably the most sophisticated, it is quite complex. You can encapsulate the "try something, or else get me the default" by using a function that returns a function.

 import scala.util.Try

 def safeConverter[A](convert: String => A, default: A) = { input: String =>
    Try(convert(input)).getOrElse(default)
 }

 val safeToInt = safeConverter(_.toInt, 0)
 val safeToLong = safeConverter(_.toLong, 0L)
 val safeToDouble = safeConverter(_.toDouble, 0.0)

 safeToInt("334") // Returns 334
 safeToInt("this is not a number") // Returns 0

converter returns a function that performs conversion of a String with a default in case an exception is thrown.

You can use this converter for any conversion that potentially throws an exception, not just numeric values.

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