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I'm using Visual Studio 2008 Express edition, and keep getting the following error:

"Cascadedisplay.h(4) : fatal error C1014: too many include files : depth = 1024.

Obviously I'm doing something very wrong with include files, but I just can't see what.

Basically, I have an interface class, StackDisplay, from which I want to derive CascadeDisplay in another file:

#if !defined __BASE_STACK_DISPLAY_H__
#define __BASE_STACK_DISPAY_H__

#include <boost\shared_ptr.hpp>
#include "CascadeDisplay.h"

namespace Sol
{
    class StackDisplay
    {
        public:
            virtual ~StackDisplay();
            static boost::shared_ptr<StackDisplay>
            make_cascade_display(boost::shared_ptr<int> csptr)
            {
                return boost::shared_ptr<StackDisplay>(new CascadeDisplay(csptr));
            }
    };
}
#endif

and then in CascadeDisplay.h:

#if !defined __CASCADE_DISPLAY_H__
#define __CASCADE_DISPAY_H__

#include "StackDisplay.h"
#include <boost\shared_ptr.hpp>

namespace Sol
{
    class CascadeDisplay: public StackDisplay
    {
        public:
            CascadeDisplay(boost::shared_ptr<int> csptr){};
    };
}

#endif

So what's up with that?

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3  
I would try to avoid having each header include the other. –  kenny Mar 13 '10 at 12:12
    
I would remove that static function from the base. It doesn't belong there. It could be a free function (e.g in a namespace), declared in "CascadeDisplay.h". - Headers including each other simply won't work. –  UncleBens Mar 13 '10 at 12:21
    
I believe it's likely that there's a design flaw here that goes deeper than your typo'd header guard. –  Greg D Mar 13 '10 at 12:23
    
@UncleBens, I used the static function in an attempt to emulate Scott Meyers in Item 31 of Effective C++. Its possible I've misunderstood where he's coming from however. –  BeeBand Mar 13 '10 at 12:46
    
As a side note, you should rename your header guard defines. Identifiers containing double underscore or beginning with a single underscore followed by an upper-case character (or anything beginning with a single underscore in namespace scope (outside classes and functions) is reserved to the implementation. The compiler probably doesn't define __CASCADE_DISPLAY_H__, but it could, and it would be legal for it to do so. Using something like CASCADE_DISPLAY_H_ instead would be guaranteed not to conflict with anything the compiler or standard library uses. –  jalf Mar 13 '10 at 14:33
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is #if !defined... legit? I always used #ifndef.

Either way, why does your "base" class require the reference to CascadeDisplay? That doesn't seem right. Consider replacing your call to create a new CascadeDisplay with a call to a pure virtual function in StackDisplay that your subclass must implement appropriately.

IE, something like (and forgive, I don't have a c++ compiler handy to check this):

namespace Sol
{
    class StackDisplay
    {
        public:
            virtual ~StackDisplay();
            boost::shared_ptr<StackDisplay>
            make_cascade_display(boost::shared_ptr<int> csptr)
            {
                return make_display(csptr);
            }

        protected:
            virtual boost::shared_ptr<StackDisplay> make_display(boost::shared_ptr<int> csptr) = 0;
    };

    class CascadeDisplay: public StackDisplay
    {
        public:
            CascadeDisplay(boost::shared_ptr<int> csptr){};

        protected:
            virtual boost::shared_ptr<StackDisplay> make_display(boost::shared_ptr<int> csptr)
            {
                return new CascadeDisplay(csptr);
            }
    };
}

I believe this solution is superior, in general, to the forward declaration because you're eliminating some tight coupling between your superclass and your subclass, and making a more generic interface besides. This lets you eliminate the #include of CascadeDisplay.h in StackDisplay.h.

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Greg, I have used your code and it compiles fine. I was using that reference to CascadeDisplay in the base class because of Item 31 in Effective C++. Scott Meyers did it, so I thought I would. Your solution is indeed superior however. –  BeeBand Mar 13 '10 at 12:39
    
Having said that, your solution does not allow me to call make_cascade_display() on a StackDisplay pointer without making it a static function. If I do this, I get a complaint regarding the illegal call of the non-static make_display() from the static make_cascade_display. –  BeeBand Mar 13 '10 at 14:11
    
Ah, I consider this to be part of the difficulty of conflating two roles in a single class. In general, I consider the "creation" of an object to be different from the "use" of an object, and so I typically prefer to create a separate factory class rather than use a factory method-- Especially in C++. A ghetto workaround to keep your method static might involve making a static settable property on StackDisplay that is a function pointer to the equivalent of the make_display method. –  Greg D Mar 13 '10 at 14:26
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#if !defined __CASCADE_DISPLAY_H__
#define __CASCADE_DISPAY_H__

Second line should be:

#define __CASCADE_DISPLAY_H__

Same with:

#if !defined __BASE_STACK_DISPLAY_H__
#define __BASE_STACK_DISPAY_H__

Also, names that contain a double-underscore are reserved for the implementation, you are not allowed to create such names in your own code. Same goes for names that begin with a single underscore and an uppercase letter.

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6  
@BeeBand: Use #ifndef to make typos like this visible. #ifndef is the same length as #define, so the macro names will be aligned, and you'll spot immediately that one is missing a character. :) –  UncleBens Mar 13 '10 at 12:30
    
@UncleBens, good tip –  BeeBand Mar 13 '10 at 12:49
    
+1 For the double underscore reserved for implementation. –  Thomas Matthews Mar 13 '10 at 18:16
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There is a typo in your guards

#if !defined __CASCADE_DISPLAY_H__     <--- here you have DISPLAY
#define __CASCADE_DISPAY_H__           <--- here you have DISPAY (no L!)

and yes, avoid double underscores in such names

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