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I'm wondering why this code print the same members address differently :

template <typename FI>
void sorta(FI begin, FI end){
    using T = typename std::iterator_traits<FI>::value_type;
    std::sort(begin, end, [](const T& lhs,const T& rhs){
         std::cout << lhs<<"**"<<&lhs  << '\n';
         return std::rand()%2;
    });
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> a{1,5,3,4,7};
    sorta(a.begin(),a.end());
}

live

possible outputs :

5**0x25e5014
3**0x25e5018
3**0x7fff93d5d3e0
...

As you can see address of variable 3 is different in every function call !

It seems weird I tried a simple function which is do something simillar to std::sort :

using Iterator=std::vector<int>::iterator;
template<class Func>
void foo(Iterator begin,Iterator end,Func f)
{
    for(Iterator it=begin; it != end-1;++it)
    {
         auto f2=[&begin,&f](int& lhs,int& rhs){
            std::cout<<&(*begin)<<"\n"<<&lhs<<"  "<<&rhs;
            f(lhs,rhs);
        };

         f2(*it,*(it+1));
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> a{1,5,3,4,7};

    foo(a.begin(),a.end(),[](int& lhs,int& rhs){
        std::cout<<"\n"<<&lhs<<"  "<<&rhs<<"\n\n\n";
    });
}

live

possible outputs:

0x837a008
0x837a008  0x837a00c
0x837a008  0x837a00c

0x837a008
0x837a00c  0x837a010
0x837a00c  0x837a010

...

Surprise !

Addresses are same in this case , So I expect the std::sort do the same thing !!

What is wrong with the first code ? Is std::sort copying variables multiple times?!

use case :

I'm trying to write a sort function which return source indices too but because of the problem that I explained It doesn't work

template <typename FI ,class L >
std::vector<int> sorta(FI begin, FI end, L comp_proc){
    size_t size = std::distance(begin, end);
    using T = typename std::iterator_traits<FI>::value_type;

    std::vector <int> indexs(size);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < indexs.size(); i++)
        indexs[i] = i;

    std::sort(begin, end, [&comp_proc,&begin,&indexs](const T& l_item,const T& r_item){

        size_t l_dis = std::distance(&(*begin),const_cast<T*>(&l_item));//not working correctly
        size_t r_dis = std::distance(&(*begin),const_cast<T*>(&r_item));//not working correctly
        std::cout << l_item<<"**"<<&l_item <<"**"<<l_dis << "**" << r_dis << std::endl;

        bool res = comp_proc(l_item, r_item);
        if (const_cast<T*>(&l_item) > &(*begin) && const_cast<T*>(&r_item) > &(*begin)){
            if (res){
                std::swap(indexs[l_dis], indexs[r_dis]);//not working
            }
        }

        return res;
    });
    return indexs;

}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> a{1,5,3,4,7};
    std::vector<int> indexes=sorta(a.begin(),a.end(),[](const int& a,const int& b){return a<b;});

    std::cout<<"\n";
    for(auto i:indexes)
    {
        std::cout<<i<<"\n";
    }
}

live

Other solutions for writing such function also appreciated (without making and sorting a std::pair)

share|improve this question
1  
sort is allowed to use local variables and compare them to elements of sorted range. It is not guaranteed that all pointers will point to elements of array. –  zch Jun 24 '14 at 11:55
    
Your asking why the "same" entries have different addresses in a sort routine? The entries are moved during the sort including occupying temporaries (and in this case, utterly unpredictably because you're comparator is violating the strict weak order required by std::sort). " So I expect the std::sort do the same thing." - Had you written it, it probably would. –  WhozCraig Jun 24 '14 at 11:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

std::sort uses a sort with O(n*log(n)) complexity. It can be for example (an optimized version of) quicksort. It selects a pivot, moves the smaller elements before the pivot, the bigger elements after the pivot and repeats it recursively on the first and second half.

That also mean that std::sort is allowed to (and to be fast it needs to) move the elements of the vector multiple times during the sort. The comparison function will see them at their current location.

The odd out-of-vector addresses show that std::sort moves elements during sorting to the stack as well. To be specific: (g++ 4.8.2) for example __unguarded_linear_insert in bits/std_algo.h moves its argument to the stack.


The original positions of the elements are lost during the sort. You have to use std::pair or some other method to store the original positions if you want to use them.


From Angew's answer: Also an important note that your comparator is not consistent. This is undefined behaviour and can give segfaults with different input.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not explain why he sees addresses that are clearly outside the vector. –  ComicSansMS Jun 24 '14 at 11:56
    
@ComicSansMS my guess is that std::sort saves the pivot into a local variable. –  Csq Jun 24 '14 at 12:01
    
@Csq: To be honest, I am surprised it does, as this may imply an expensive copy; but the address is pretty clear indeed. –  Matthieu M. Jun 24 '14 at 13:26
    
@MatthieuM. found it in the code :) (updated the answer). sort moves the elements several times anyway. –  Csq Jun 24 '14 at 13:49

First off, you have undefined behaviour because the predicate you're passing to std::sort is not internally consistent - it's possible it will report a < b and b < a at the same time.

Even without that, the purpose of std::sort is to sort the range - exchange elements within it so that they're in the correct order (according to the predicate). So of course the elements will move around the range.

share|improve this answer

It prints out different adresses, because some of the elements are stored in temporary variables, on the stack, while others being moved.

5**0x25e5014    // This is in the original array
3**0x25e5018    // This too
3**0x7fff93d5d3e0   // This is on the stack

The "smaller" memory addresses usually correspond to values in the file's images (function addresses, global variables, etc.) while the highers are usually heap or stack allocated addresses. 0x7fff******** is usually on the stack in 64 bit programs, but it's just from my personal experience in debugging, and not set in stone.

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