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I have two iterators, a list and an itertools.count object (i.e. an infinite value generator). I would like to merge these two into a resulting iterator that will alternate yield values between the two:

>>> import itertools
>>> c = itertools.count(1)
>>> items = ['foo', 'bar']
>>> merged = imerge(items, c)  # the mythical "imerge"
>>> merged.next()
'foo'
>>> merged.next()
1
>>> merged.next()
'bar'
>>> merged.next()
2
>>> merged.next()
Traceback (most recent call last):
    ...
StopIteration

What is the simplest, most concise way to do this?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 24 down vote accepted

A generator will solve your problem nicely.

def imerge(a, b):
    for i, j in itertools.izip(a,b):
        yield i
        yield j
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7  
You should add a disclaimer - this will only work if list a is finite. –  Claudiu Oct 28 '08 at 16:17
    
import itertools def imerge(a, b): for i, j in zip(a,b): yield i yield j c = itertools.count(1) items = ['foo', 'bar'] for i in imerge(c, items): print i I'm trying this, and this still works. len(zipped list) = min(l1, l2). So the finite length restriction is not required. –  Pramod Oct 28 '08 at 16:22
2  
Claudiu is correct. Try zipping two infinite generators--you will run out of memory eventually. I would prefer using itertools.izip instead of zip. Then you build the zip as you go, instead of all at once. You still have to watch out for infinite loops, but hey. –  David Eyk Oct 28 '08 at 16:40
1  
This would be my accepted answer, as I like the concise clarity of it. However, I balk at the use of zip instead of itertools.izip. –  David Eyk Oct 28 '08 at 16:49
2  
In Python 3.0 zip() behaves like itertools.izip(). –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 1 '08 at 21:47

You can do something that is almost exaclty what @Pramod first suggested.

def izipmerge(a, b):
  for i, j in itertools.izip(a,b):
    yield i
    yield j

The advantage of this approach is that you won't run out of memory if both a and b are infinite.

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Quite correct, David. @Pramod changed his answer to use izip before I noticed yours, but thanks! –  David Eyk Oct 28 '08 at 17:03

I'd do something like this. This will be most time and space efficient, since you won't have the overhead of zipping objects together. This will also work if both a and b are infinite.

def imerge(a, b):
    i1 = iter(a)
    i2 = iter(b)
    while True:
        try:
            yield i1.next()
            yield i2.next()
        except StopIteration:
            return
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The try/except here breaks the iterator protocol by muffling the StopIteration, doesn't it? –  David Eyk Oct 28 '08 at 16:46
    
@David Eyk: it's OK, because returning from a generator raises StopIteration anyway. The try statement in this case is superfluous. –  efotinis Oct 28 '08 at 18:00
    
@efotinis: I did not know this. Thanks! –  David Eyk Oct 29 '08 at 3:48

I also agree that itertools is not needed.

But why stop at 2?

  def tmerge(*iterators):
    for values in zip(*iterators):
      for value in values:
        yield value

handles any number of iterators from 0 on upwards.

UPDATE: DOH! A commenter pointed out that this won't work unless all the iterators are the same length.

The correct code is:

def tmerge(*iterators):
  empty = {}
  for values in itertools.izip_longest(*iterators, fillvalue=empty):
    for value in values:
      if value is not empty:
        yield value

and yes, I just tried it with lists of unequal length, and a list containing {}.

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Does this exhaust each iterator ? I think zip will truncate to the shortest one. I'm looking for a merge that takes one from each iterator in turn, until each of them is exhausted. –  Thomas Vander Stichele Apr 12 '12 at 19:33
    
How embarrassing. You are perfectly correct! See my improved code here. –  Tom Swirly Apr 13 '12 at 20:46
    
No embarassment needed, your reply and quick response saved me hours of pain! –  Thomas Vander Stichele May 11 '12 at 20:45

You can use zip as well as itertools.chain. This will only work if the first list is finite:

merge=itertools.chain(*[iter(i) for i in zip(['foo', 'bar'], itertools.count(1))])
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1  
Why do you have a restriction on the size of the first list? –  Pramod Oct 28 '08 at 16:17
3  
It doesn't need to be so complicated, though: merged = chain.from_iterable(izip(items, count(1))) will do it. –  intuited Jun 21 '10 at 3:28

I'm not sure what your application is, but you might find the enumerate() function more useful.

>>> items = ['foo', 'bar', 'baz']
>>> for i, item in enumerate(items):
...  print item
...  print i
... 
foo
0
bar
1
baz
2
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I always forget about enumerate! What a useful little tool, though it won't work in my particular application. Thanks! –  David Eyk Oct 29 '08 at 3:54

One of the less well known features of Python is that you can have more for clauses in a generator expression. Very useful for flattening nested lists, like those you get from zip()/izip().

def imerge(*iterators):
    return (value for row in itertools.izip(*iterators) for value in row)
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1  
Definitely would work, though I find nested generator expressions less than readable. I'd use this style if I were worried about performance. –  David Eyk Mar 30 '11 at 17:07
    
It is really concise, as Python often is, but how does one begin to see what this code does? What is the effect of value for row in ... followed by for value in row? Isn't this a nested list-comprehension-generator? shouldn't it end with something like for rowvalue in row or is value shadowed? –  Steven Lu Jun 5 '13 at 15:20
    
@StevenLu Basically it's two nested loops, like this: for row in itertools.izip(*iterators): for value in row: yield value –  Petr Viktorin Jun 6 '13 at 11:31

I prefer this other way which is much more concise:

iter = reduce(lambda x,y: itertools.chain(x,y), iters)
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Why is itertools needed?

def imerge(a,b):
    for i,j in zip(a,b):
    	yield i
    	yield j

In this case at least one of a or b must be of finite length, cause zip will return a list, not an iterator. If you need an iterator as output then you can go for the Claudiu solution.

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I prefer an iterator, as I'm reading values from files of arbitrary size. I'm sure there are cases where zip is superior. –  David Eyk Oct 29 '08 at 3:53

Using itertools.izip(), instead of zip() as in some of the other answers, will improve performance:

As "pydoc itertools.izip" shows: "Works like the zip() function but consumes less memory by returning an iterator instead of a list."

Itertools.izip will also work properly even if one of the iterators is infinite.

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Use izip and chain together:

>>> list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(itertools.izip(items, c))) # 2.6 only
['foo', 1, 'bar', 2]

>>> list(itertools.chain(*itertools.izip(items, c)))
['foo', 1, 'bar', 2]
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A concise method is to use a generator expression with itertools.cycle(). It avoids creating a long chain() of tuples.

generator = (it.next() for it in itertools.cycle([i1, i2]))
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