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This sounds like a common problem, so whats the best practice if you have a base class A with a public property of type List<SuperClass> and you inherit that list in class B but want to use a more specialized type parameter for the list:

class SuperClass 
{
    public bool Flag;
}

class SubClass : SuperClass 
{
    public int Number;
}

class A
{
    public List<SuperClass> Elements { get; }
}

class B : A
{
   public List<SubClass> Elements { get; set; }
}

So how can in overwrite the Elements list with a new list, but still make sure it will be accessed if another class only knows A objects?

class C
{
    List<A> AList;

    void FillList()
    {
        AList.Add(new B());
    }

    void DoSomething()
    {
        foreach (var a in AList)
            forach(var super in a.Elements)
                super.Flag = true;  
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You cannot override it because they are different types. Are you looking for new to hide the base implementation? public new List<SubClass> Elements { get; set; } –  Tim Schmelter Jun 24 '14 at 13:00
1  
here's a good post you could read about this subject: stackoverflow.com/questions/2231668/… –  Default Jun 24 '14 at 13:02
    
Looks like a design problem. Why are you creating a List<A> when you want to put items in that list which are known by class B? –  user743414 Jun 24 '14 at 13:52

2 Answers 2

I gave it a try.

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {

        var c = new C();
        c.FillList();
        c.DoSomething();


        Console.ReadKey();

    }
}


class C {
    List<A> AList;

    public void FillList() {
        AList = new List<A>();

        var a = new A();
        a.Elements = new List<SuperClass>() { new SubClass(), new SuperClass() };
        AList.Add(a);

        var b = new B();
        b.Elements = new List<SubClass>() { new SubClass(), new SubClass() };
        AList.Add(b);
    }

    public void DoSomething() {
        foreach (var a in AList)
            foreach (var super in a.Elements) { 
                super.Flag = true;
                Console.WriteLine(super.GetName());
            }
    }
}


class SuperClass {
    public bool Flag;
    public virtual string GetName() { return "super"; } 
}
class SubClass : SuperClass {
    public SubClass() { }
    public SubClass(SuperClass x) { }

    public int Number;
    public override string GetName() { return "sub"; } 
}

class A {

    public virtual IEnumerable<SuperClass> Elements {
        get{
            return elementList.AsEnumerable();
        }
        set {
            elementList = value.ToList();
        }
    }

    private List<SuperClass> elementList;
}

class B : A {

    public override IEnumerable<SuperClass> Elements {
        get {
            return elementList.AsEnumerable();
        }
        set {
            elementList = value.Aggregate(new List<SubClass>(), 
                                (acc, x) => {
                                    if (x is SubClass) 
                                        acc.Add((SubClass)x);
                                    else 
                                        acc.Add(new SubClass(x)); 
                                    return acc; });
        }
    }

    private List<SubClass> elementList;
}

I use IEnumerable. And convert IEnumerable<SuperClass> to List<SubClass> when setter property (of class B) was called.

share|improve this answer
    
this looks good and i also was as far as this, but IEnumerable is not enough in my scenario, i need random access with an indexer and also the ability to sort the original list. –  thalm Jun 24 '14 at 13:51

You cannot. Because as it stands, if you insert a SuperClass through the A interface, B would fail, because SuperClass cannot be inserted into B's SubClass list.

The specific terms you should google are Covariance and Contravariance.

Your scenario can be solved if you restrict your classes to read access at least in the base class. Then you could have two read-only properties in your B class, one specialized, one not specialized but returning the specialized version.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, but whats the best practice in this case? can i construct a ReadOnlyList<SuperClass> from the List<SubClass> and publish this one? –  thalm Jun 24 '14 at 13:10
    
@thalm best practice for what? Could you give an example of what your scenario is and how you want to use it? Sure you can use a ReadOnlyList, but that won't have any connection to the current list. Or you can use Covariance and Contravariance as nvoigt wrote and use in and out parameters. But "best practice" kind of depends on how you are going to use it –  Default Jun 24 '14 at 13:25
    
in this particular scenario the classes which only know A and the SuperClass need read access to the list and also need to sort the list by a float property of the SuperClass. –  thalm Jun 24 '14 at 13:41

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